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Teen influencer Danielle Cohn appeared to suggest she was really 14 in an Instagram live, reviving questions about her age

Fans and critics of Danielle Cohn have speculated about whether she's really 16 or if she's actually younger. 

<p class=Albert L. Ortega/Getty Images

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Fans and critics of Danielle Cohn have speculated about whether she’s really 16 or if she’s actually younger.
  • Controversial teen influencer Danielle Cohn has been the subject of scrutiny for years, particuarly over questions about her real age.

  • Cohn and her mother say she turned 16 in March 2020, but Cohn’s father wrote an explosive Facebook post last year claiming she was actually only 13 at the time, which would make her 14 today.

  • In a recent livestream, Cohn was answering fan questions about whether she’d have a baby with her current boyfriend, and Cohn said she would consider it in “5 or 6 years” — when she is “19 or 20.”

  • That timeline would make her 14 now, but Cohn’s mother says she simply did the math wrong.

  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Speculation about influencer Danielle

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Selling Sunset’s most Googled questions answered

Photo credit: Netflix
Photo credit: Netflix

From Cosmopolitan

When it comes to a flawless reality TV formula, there’s one thing for certain: Selling Sunset has it nailed. The show’s luxury Hollywood real estate, outrageously glam cast, and wall-to-wall drama make it the perfect marathon watch. Basically, we’re a little bit obsessed. And it looks like we’re not the only ones, judging by all the Selling Sunset searches everyone’s been making. Here’s a rundown of some of the most Googled Selling Sunset questions along with the answers. You’re most welcome.

How does commission work?

The Oppenheim Group agents don’t earn a base salary and are only paid on the commission they make, which varies depending on the price of the property. Commission is basically a percentage of the full cost of the house they sell. For example, if an agent sells a house for $800,000 and are working with a 5% commission, the commission

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Answers To 7 Critical Questions On Oversize/Overweight Permits

In 2011, a Putzmeister 70Z-Meter concrete pumper truck needed to navigate Georgia highways on its way to Japan. The 70Z, so named because its pumper, affixed to a Kenworth truck, stretches roughly 230 feet (70 meters) when fully deployed. The vehicle, the world’s largest concrete pumper at the time, was heading to Japan to help with recovery following the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant disaster.

John Taylor of PDLDrivers was tasked with getting the 10-axle, 179,000-pound pumper to Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport for its flight.

“A couple of days before we had to move the truck, Georgia decided we couldn’t move it,” Taylor, a driver training and staff development specialist with PDLDrivers, told FreightWaves.

The state decided the boom was just too big, so it needed to be removed before the truck could travel on the state’s roadways. The pumper eventually made it to Japan, but the experience illustrates the difficulty … Read More

Your 10 key A-level results questions answered

A-levels - Lalalimola
A-levels – Lalalimola

Despite trepidation that university just won’t be the same, this is still a great year to go – so say politicians, career experts and academics. “I truly believe a good degree is worth the investment,” says Sam Gyimah, the former minister for universities, “for all those reasons that make a university education worth it” – better jobs, personal development, and sought-after, 21st-century skills.

Dire warnings of mass deferrals this year haven’t yet materialised. More 18-year-olds than ever – a record four in 10 – have applied this year, despite a population dip.

But for young people who have for years looked forward to traditional student rites of passage – heaving bars and packed lectures – campuses and study will feel different.

Students this year are worried, says Grace Joyce, community manager at online community The Student Room. They mostly fret about how they’ll socialise and live, asking:

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Here are parents’ biggest questions answered

The back to school season for Jillian Glawson, a mom of three in Texas, looks much different this year.

Instead of just shopping for pencils and backpacks for her two older kids, ages 8 and 5, Glawson is searching for curriculum plans. She and her husband have decided to homeschool their kindergartener and third-grader instead of sending them back to their local public school during the coronavirus pandemic.

“Probably the primary reason was the inconsistency of whether or not they were going to shut down and how they’re going to do it,” Glawson said of her school district’s plan to deal with COVID-19 outbreaks. “Right now they said they’ll close for five days if there’s a positive [COVID-19 case]. How often are they going to do that? How strict are they going to be?”

“For kindergarten and for third grade to be interrupted all year long was not going to

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I wasn’t laid off but COVID-19 cut my hours. Can I get unemployment? Your money questions, answered

It’s hard out there. And, in this time of uncertainty, USA TODAY is working to find answers to your money questions – anything from stimulus checks or unemployment benefits to your 401(k) or retirement plans. You can submit your questions here and read earlier answers below.

We will be updating the Q&A, so check back often. But, also look to these places:

I heard ‘it should be’ or that ‘it should automatically update to be retroactive.’ Could Florida be withholding funds?

Answer: If you get any unemployment assistance at all, the $600 from the federal government is supposed to accompany it. And yes it is retroactive.

… I thought the CARES Act was supposed to help. I’m losing my entire mortgage payment per month and my hours have decreased, but I don’t qualify for anything, the unemployment office said.

Each state has its own guidelines, according to the Department of … Read More

9 questions to help vet your back-to-school choices

In Brandon Wislocki’s fifth grade class this spring in California, daily virtual classes were an experiment in creativity.

The Zoom sessions featured guitar playing, group discussions about literature, live math lessons, checks for understanding through Zoom’s chat function and silly games, such as Oreo stacking and household scavenger hunts.

The remote lessons featured something many students didn’t get this spring when the coronavirus forced instruction online: the learning of new material.

Wislocki’s students at Stonegate Elementary in Irvine, California, still covered the core math and English standards that would have been taught in person from mid-March to the end of the school year. 

Brandon Wislocki, a fifth grade teacher at Stonegate Elementary School in Irvine, Calif., starts many of his virtual classes by singing to students.
Brandon Wislocki, a fifth grade teacher at Stonegate Elementary School in Irvine, Calif., starts many of his virtual classes by singing to students.

The experience suggests online learning doesn’t have to be bad. There are ways to make it more engaging and effective, education experts said. But

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With college looming, experts answer 6 of parents’ most pressing questions

No one knows what the new academic year will look like at colleges. <span class="copyright">(Simone Noronha / For The Times)</span>
No one knows what the new academic year will look like at colleges. (Simone Noronha / For The Times)

When civil engineering student Itzel Zapata returned to Cal Poly last month, her mother, Rebecca, sent her to San Luis Obispo prepared for the COVID-19 pandemic.

“I packed face masks, gloves and sanitizing wipes,” the Palmdale food services manager said. “We have to be prepared. I’m making sure both my daughters can identify the signs and know to quarantine themselves. I told them, ‘Let’s stay safe, healthy and make sure we stay alive.’”

As coronavirus cases have skyrocketed in California and across the country, Zapata said she is admittedly relieved Itzel is only three hours away and younger daughter Mariah, 18, who missed out on many milestones marking her senior year in high school, will be living at home when her fall classes start at the College of the Canyons in

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9 questions to ask to vet your back-to-school choices

In Brandon Wislocki’s fifth-grade class this spring in California, daily virtual classes were an experiment in creativity.

The Zoom sessions featured guitar playing, group discussions about literature, live math lessons, checks for understanding through Zoom’s chat function, and silly games, such as Oreo-stacking and household scavenger hunts.

The remote lessons also featured something many students didn’t get this spring when the coronavirus forced instruction online: the learning of new material.

Wislocki’s students at Stonegate Elementary in Irvine, California, still covered the core math and English standards that otherwise would have been taught in-person between mid-March and the end of the year. 

Brandon Wislocki, a fifth-grade teacher at Stonegate Elementary School in Irvine, California, started many of his virtual classes by singing to students.
Brandon Wislocki, a fifth-grade teacher at Stonegate Elementary School in Irvine, California, started many of his virtual classes by singing to students.

The experience suggests online learning doesn’t have to be bad. In fact, there are ways to make it more engaging and effective, education experts say. But schools

Read More

As talk builds for second stimulus, questions remain about first payout

And now, time for “It’s Not a Stimulus Scam, the Sequel.”

First, consumers had to be assured in June that the navy blue, Visa debit cards that just showed up in the mail beginning in late May really did contain stimulus money. The unexpected plastic card wasn’t a scam or a special promotion, as some thought. 

Now, letters from the U.S. Department of the Treasury are being sent in July to alert consumers about unused prepaid cards and how to activate the cards in order to spend your Economic Impact Payment, if you have one sitting in a drawer somewhere. 

The letter also will show you how to get a replacement card, if you’ve lost the card or thrown it away. And this letter isn’t a scam either.

The good news: The latest envelopes containing these letters will state in red: “Not a bill or an advertisement. Important information about

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