Remote

Seattle-area families of color are talking about improving remote education. Here are some of their ideas.

Regina Elmi is the executive director of the Somali Parent Education Board. Ann Ishimaru is associate professor of education at the University of Washington. The authors wrote this piece along with 10 other African American, Somali, Latina and Vietnamese parent leaders from the Renton, Federal Way, Kent, Highline and Seattle school districts.

Thousands of families and caregivers in King County are anxious as schools operate online. In recent months, we’ve experienced the devastation of COVID-19 and a summer of reckoning with anti-Black racism sparked by the killings of Ahmaud Arbery, George Floyd, Breonna Taylor and the shooting of Jacob Blake.

We also see racial inequities deepening in our schools. As difficult and heartbreaking as this time has been, many families in BIPOC (Black, Indigenous and people of color) communities have been mobilizing and finding creative ways to support and educate their children.

We challenge educational systems to consider: What might

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Colorado College shifts to remote learning after all dorms placed under COVID-19 quarantine

Colorado College is switching to remote learning and asking on-campus students to leave after a dozen positive COVID-19 cases led the school to quarantine its freshman dorms for two weeks, the school’s leaders announced Tuesday.

The private Colorado Springs college, which enrolls about 2,200 students, is the first higher-education institution in the state to switch to remote operations after reopening its campus to in-person learning in the midst of the pandemic.

But the college is largely placing the blame for its about-face on El Paso County Public Health, which school officials said is behind the stringent quarantine guidelines that left 155 freshmen stuck inside their dorm rooms for two weeks last month after a single positive COVID-19 case was confirmed on campus.

Over the weekend, the school’s other two dorms were placed on quarantine, too, after 10 more student infections were confirmed.

El Paso County health officials did not return

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5 tips for making remote education a success, whether you’re a student, parent or teacher

It’s officially back-to-school season, and for many families this year that means switching gears to start the academic year remotely.

Virtual learning was new to many parents, students and teachers this spring when the COVID-19 pandemic forced schools to close, and some found the transition from in-person to online classes to be a challenge. This fall Coloradans are increasingly having to adapt to this format, as concerns about the virus keep schools from reopening and more parents opt for an educational stopgap rather than a return to traditional learning.

Armed with the right tools and strategies, any family or teacher can make it work, said Faylyn Emma, a high school math teacher at Colorado Connections Academy, which specializes in online education and serves more than 2,000 students throughout the Centennial State.

Here are five tips to making remote education a success in your household.

Build a routine

Children thrive when

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Student newspaper at University of Kansas students slams school’s reopening plans, demands remote learning

After one week of in-person classes, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill closed its doors to stop uncontrolled spread of COVID-19. Four hotspots surfaced in student housing and a fraternity on that campus.

Make no mistake. A similar story will likely play out at the University of Kansas if it follows through on plans to bring students back to classes in person starting Monday. Already this week, other schools, such as Michigan State University and the University of Notre Dame, suspended in-person learning because of COVID-19 outbreaks.

KU hasn’t been honest in its approach to bringing students back. When the Kansan asked about the University’s testing plans, officials declined to answer for months and implemented a saliva testing system three weeks before the start of fall classes.

When the Kansan asked a routine question about how much money was left in KU’s reserves, we were told this information

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Moms brace for school year juggling jobs, remote learning amid COVID-19 pandemic

Traci Wells was at a school board meeting when she found out the springtime balancing act between her job and helping her children with online schooling would stretch into the fall. 

“I was like, I cannot do six more months of this,” says Wells, a mother of four, who is director of education for the global health program at UCLA’s David Geffen School of Medicine. With her husband working as well, “I don’t know how we’re going to be on all the calls and get the work done when we have these responsibilities. It’s just really, really hard.”

When the coronavirus outbreak led schools to shut down in the spring, parents had to quickly rally, juggling their jobs with the added roles of teacher, tutor and occasional IT technician.

It was a stressful time, but one that many families presumed would be temporary, coming at the end of the school

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Parents brace for school year juggling jobs, remote learning amid COVID-19 pandemic

Traci Wells was at a school board meeting when she found out the springtime balancing act between her job and helping her children with online schooling would stretch into the fall. 

“I was like, I cannot do six more months of this,” says Wells, a mother of four, who is director of education for the global health program at UCLA’s David Geffen School of Medicine. With her husband working as well, “I don’t know how we’re going to be on all the calls and get the work done when we have these responsibilities. It’s just really, really hard.”

When the coronavirus outbreak led schools to shut down in the spring, parents had to quickly rally, juggling their jobs with the added roles of teacher, tutor and occasional IT technician.

It was a stressful time, but one that many families presumed would be temporary, coming at the end of the school

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What can parents who work outside the home do about remote schooling?

People who work at grocery stores can't work from home. Here, Anthony Capone, a Vons supervisor in Torrance, greets customers in April. <span class="copyright">(Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)</span>
People who work at grocery stores can’t work from home. Here, Anthony Capone, a Vons supervisor in Torrance, greets customers in April. (Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

With California schools starting up again virtually, many parents are wondering how they can get back — or stay — at work if their kids can’t physically go back to class.

It’s not a one-size-fits-all conundrum. Two-parent households of means might be able to work from home and take turns helping kids navigate distance learning or hire a tutor. A single parent who is an essential worker might find herself with fewer options.

Daniel Alvarez, who works in a food facility, said he isn’t sure how his family is going to manage his two school-age kids’ studies when his wife is finally able to return to her job as a hair stylist.

“What do we do?” Alvarez said recently while waiting in

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Pivot to remote learning creates a chance to reinvent K-12 education

<span class="caption">Lights, camera, learn!</span> <span class="attribution"><a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="https://www.gettyimages.com/detail/photo/young-african-american-director-girl-filming-a-royalty-free-image/1214258563" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:AaronAmat/iStock via Getty Images Plus"> AaronAmat/iStock via Getty Images Plus</a></span>
Lights, camera, learn! AaronAmat/iStock via Getty Images Plus

Many of the nation’s 57 million K-12 students will spend at least part of the 2020-2021 school year either dealing with distance learning or a hybrid model that keeps them out of classrooms several days a week. They’ll spend lots of time using teleconferencing software, with teachers either convening classes live or pre-recording lessons.

Getting children to excel won’t be easy. Zoom and similar programs can be challenging for teachers and boring for “digital natives” accustomed to watching more entertaining stuff on their devices.

Based on my experience both as a writer and a producer of films and TV shows in Hollywood and a lecturer at the University of Pittsburgh – where WQED, the nation’s first educational television station got started – I recommend four creative ways to overcome this problem. While challenging, this disruption in education can be a a unique

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How Schools Missed a Chance to Fix Remote Learning

The Clinton Hill School in New York, July 22, 2020. (Mark Wickens/The New York Times)
The Clinton Hill School in New York, July 22, 2020. (Mark Wickens/The New York Times)

With some combination of optimism, anxiety and wishful thinking, many educators spent their summers planning, in minute detail, how to safely reopen classrooms. Teachers stocked up on sanitation supplies as superintendents took a crash course in epidemiology and studied supply chain logistics for portable air filters.

But with the pandemic now surging across a wide swath of the country, many of those plans have been shelved, and a different reality has emerged for the nation’s exhausted and stir-crazy families: Millions of American children will spend their fall once again learning in front of laptop screens.

In places where schools haven’t already reopened — in some, to just as quickly close again — educators are spending the little time they have left before the new academic year moving to focus more fully on improving online instruction,

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5 alternative school options parents are weighing as more districts opt for remote learning

CHICAGO — Laura Reber, founder and CEO of Chicago Home Tutors, has been fielding calls from nervous parents around the clock in recent weeks, as uncertainty over fall schooling sent many searching for alternative options.

Reber, whose firm of 100 tutors has served Chicago-area students for eight years, said she understands parents’ frustrations. Her reassurances to them focus on the fact that, while it might not be an ideal year for education, their students — and their peers across the country — will get through it.

“The whole nation is going to be in the same boat,” she said. “Not that that’s a huge comfort, but if you move to a private school or another district, there’s really no guarantee that they’re not going to change their plan.”

With Mayor Lori Lightfoot announcing Wednesday that the new school year will begin with remote learning instead of a hybrid plan in

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