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Trump says open schools. Teachers say safety first. As cases rise, unions may win.

Chicago teachers piled into hundreds of cars on the first Monday of August and rolled their way to City Hall.

No strangers to large demonstrations, the teachers spent hours protesting Chicago Public Schools’ plan to mix in-school and at-home learning this fall to reduce crowding in buildings amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Staff didn’t feel safe teaching in person, the educators said, especially given rising rates of positive COVID-19 cases in Illinois. The demonstration had hallmarks of the massive strike the Chicago Teachers Union waged 10 months prior during a contract dispute with the city.

As union members murmured about potentially striking again for their safety, Mayor Lori Lightfoot announced Chicago’s near 400,000 students would start the year online-only on Sept. 8. That means almost all of America’s biggest districts will start the school year with online learning – a move largely driven by local teachers unions.

Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot, joined by Chicago Public Schools CEO Dr. Janice K. Jackson, right rear, announce a preliminary reopening framework for public schools during a press conference, Friday, July 17, 2020, at CPS Headquarters in Chicago.
Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot,
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Trump says open schools. Teachers say not until they’re safe. As cases rise, unions may win.

Chicago teachers piled into hundreds of cars on the first Monday of August and rolled their way to City Hall.

No strangers to large demonstrations, the teachers spent hours protesting Chicago Public Schools’ plan to mix in-school and at-home learning this fall to reduce crowding in buildings amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Staff didn’t feel safe teaching in person, the educators said, especially given rising rates of positive COVID-19 cases in Illinois. The demonstration had hallmarks of the massive strike the Chicago Teachers Union waged 10 months prior during a contract dispute with the city.

As union members murmured about potentially striking again for their safety, Mayor Lori Lightfoot announced Chicago’s near 400,000 students would start the year online-only on Sept. 8. That means almost all of America’s biggest districts will start the school year with online learning — a move largely driven by local teachers unions.

Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot, joined by Chicago Public Schools CEO Dr. Janice K. Jackson, right rear, announce a preliminary reopening framework for public schools during a press conference, Friday, July 17, 2020, at CPS Headquarters in Chicago.
Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot,
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The rise of Jake Paul, the YouTube megastar whose home was raided by the FBI as part of an ongoing investigation

Jake Paul.
Jake Paul.

Eric Charbonneau/Invision for Lionsgate Home Entertainment/AP Images

  • Jake Paul is a 23-year-old YouTube star who got his start on video-sharing app Vine.

  • The former Disney Channel actor has nearly 20 million subscribers on YouTube, where he posts vlogs and pranks.

  • Paul appeared to marry fellow YouTuber Tana Mongeau in 2019, but it was later revealed that the marriage was fake. 

  • The FBI raided Paul’s Calabasas, California mansion on Wednesday as part of an ongoing investigation into unspecified “criminal acts” regarding Paul’s May visit to a Scottsdale, Arizona, mall, an agency spokesperson said. 

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Jake Paul, 23, is one-half of the Paul brothers, two of the most recognizable and controversial YouTube stars. Paul garnered online fame on Vine before even graduating high school, and found early notoriety as a star on Disney Channel. 

Since then, Paul has gained millions of followers across social

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U.S. Cases Rise 1.1%; California Second-Worst Day: Virus Update

(Bloomberg) — California had its second-deadliest day in the pandemic and Florida’s case count topped 500,000. Texas’s test positivity rate reached a three-week high. New York City is setting up checkpoints at key entry areas to enforce state quarantine rules for travelers.

Joe Biden will accept the Democratic Party’s nomination from Delaware rather than risk traveling to Milwaukee. Chicago, the country’s third-largest school district, will have remote learning for public schools when classes resume next month.

Johnson & Johnson will supply 100 million doses of its experimental Covid-19 vaccine to the U.S. The U.K. agreed to invest $18 million in a Scottish vaccine-manufacturing plant, while Moderna Inc. said it has received $400 million of deposits for its potential Covid-19 shot.

Key Developments

Global Tracker: Global cases top 18.6 million; deaths pass 702,000Fauci says testing too slow while Trump says it’s ‘best ever’CDC warns against drinking sanitizer after reports of deathsJapan’s

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The furious rise of mask rage

An anti-mask protest in July attracted a few hundred attendees – and howls of anger on social media - Getty
An anti-mask protest in July attracted a few hundred attendees – and howls of anger on social media – Getty

It is ten o’clock in the local Sainsbury’s, and every other customer is following the rules and wearing a face covering.  Except one anti-masker in the second aisle. Most shoppers respond with time-honoured British understatement, tut-tutting behind their masks, or rolling their eyes at the miscreant to shame him.

But for one masked mother, with her small child, his lack of contrition is the final straw. She gives the refusnik what for. When that doesn’t work, she picks up a tub of double cream and chucks it into his face.

That is the story currently doing the rounds on social media – though the originator has chosen to remain anonymous. And there are many more going viral, from both sides of what has become a new dividing line in our

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Colleges are increasingly going online for fall 2020 semester as COVID-19 cases rise

Call it coronavirus déjà vu. After planning ways to reopen campuses this fall, colleges are increasingly changing their minds, dramatically increasing online offerings or canceling in-person classes outright.  

This sudden shift will be familiar to students whose spring plans were interrupted by the rapid spread of the coronavirus. Now, COVID-19 cases in much of the country are much higher than in the spring, and rising in many places. 

In many cases, the colleges had released plans for socially distant in-person classes only a few weeks ago, hoping to beat the coronavirus.

“Instead,” said Robert Kelchen, a professor of higher education at Seton Hall University, “the virus beat us.”

Just as in the spring, students have been left scrambling to adjust their class schedules and living arrangements, faced with paying expensive tuition for online classes and rent for an apartment they may not need. Digital classes are still unappealing to many,

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Fauci makes pitch for baseball’s return; ‘Cuomo Chips a hit in New York; jobless claims rise for first time since March

Major League Baseball’s opening day finally arrived Thursday, the virus-shortened season kicking off almost four months late and minus fans in the stands. 

The Washington Nationals, last year’s World Series champs, were hosting the venerable New York Yankees – with the equally venerable Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation’s leading infectious disease expert, tossing out the ceremonial first pitch.

In New York state, officials had to tighten guidelines for the mandate that bars serve food with their drinks. A handful of “Cuomo Chips” apparently does not meet the requirement. Gov. Andrew Cuomo, having fought off a deadly COVID-19 charge in the spring, is adamant that the state won’t go there again.

Nationally, the daily death toll surpassed 1,000 for the second straight day and hospitalizations were again peaking. The paralyzing coronavirus pandemic, beaten back by New York and a few other states, showed little sign of easing nationwid.

The Johns Hopkins

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US deaths surpass 1,000 for second straight day, jobless claims rise for first time since March; baseball is back

The daily U.S. death toll surpassed 1,000 for the second straight day and hospitalizations were again peaking as the paralyzing coronavirus pandemic showed little sign of easing Thursday.

The Johns Hopkins University data dashboard reported 1,195 U.S. deaths Wednesday, high by standards of recent weeks but still only half of the daily toll during the outbreak’s deadly peak in the spring. The Covid Tracking Project, however, showed almost 60,000 people are currently hospitalized, less than 200 short of the highest totals from April. 

The Labor Department reported Thursday that 1.4 million people filed intial applications for unemployment benefits last week, the first weekly increase since March.

Major League Baseball was providing a silver lining, opening its season Thursday. The virus-shortened season comes almost four months late and minus fans in the stands. The Washington Nationals, last year’s World Series champs, were hosting the venerable New York Yankees – with the

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