risks

Florida Bar examinees worry online testing software poses security risks

First, the state’s prospective lawyers had health concerns about taking the Florida Bar exam in the time of coronavirus. Now that the test has been moved on-line, they’re voicing worries about security issues with the software they will have to use to take the remote exam.

The high-pressure exam was moved on-line on July 1 after a Miami Herald story on the COVID-19 health concerns raised by students. A sit-down test was originally scheduled for July 28 and 29, but the Florida Board of Bar Examiners moved it to an Aug. 19 virtual format.

Now, the exam is being administered using a software platform from ILG Technologies. But, test-takers have reported complaints of the software causing data breaches and the program messing with their computers.

On Aug. 10, some Bar examinees sent a letter to the Florida Supreme Court asking them to intervene and help the FBBE find an alternative

Read More

‘If I Had Known The Risks Before Getting Breast Implants, I 100-Percent Would Have Said No’

Photo credit: jade4fitness - Instagram
Photo credit: jade4fitness – Instagram

From Women’s Health

Something weird was going on with Laura Miranda’s left breast; the shape was changing. Two days prior to her noticing that something looked off, she’d had her first mammogram (breast cancer runs in her family, so she’s vigilant about getting the necessary tests). Now, her left breast seemed to be “deflated,” as she describes. It was June of 2016.

She’d gotten implants on a whim at 22 to fulfill the big-busted aesthetic ideal at the time. They were offered to her as a gift by the gym she worked for early in her career as a trainer—the athletic club had a partnership with a plastic surgery group, and she was meant to be a sort of walking advertisement for them.

She suspected the pressure from the x-ray machine had caused a leak in one of the implants since she’d previously

Read More

Your kids could get the coronavirus when they go back to school. These are the risks and benefits to weigh before sending them.

school coronavirus
school coronavirus

Getty

  • Parents are weighing the coronavirus-related risks of sending their kids to school against the education and social losses of keeping them home. 

  • Kids are generally less susceptible to severe illness than adults, but it’s still possible for them to be infected. 

  • Keeping your child home could negatively impact their mental health and delay their social and educational development. 

  • The prevalence of the virus in your community and your school’s plans for controlling the virus also matter. 

  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

This was supposed to be Vanessa Wingerath’s “golden year.” For the first time, her three young children would all be in school, and the Tucson-based doula would have more time to focus on herself and career.  

Then the coronavirus pandemic hit, and sending kids to school was no longer a given. 

Sending only one or two kids to school could topple the family dynamic. Keeping

Read More

Citing Educational Risks, Scientific Panel Urges That Schools Reopen

Outside Publis School 161 in New York, March 24, 2020. (Gabriela Bhaskar/The New York Times)
Outside Publis School 161 in New York, March 24, 2020. (Gabriela Bhaskar/The New York Times)

Wading into the contentious debate over reopening schools, an influential committee of scientists and educators Wednesday recommended that, wherever possible, younger children and those with special needs should attend school in person.

Their report — issued by the prestigious National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine, which advises the nation on issues related to science — is less prescriptive for middle and high schools but offered a framework for school districts to decide whether and how to open, with help from public health experts, families and teachers.

The committee emphasized common-sense precautions, such as hand-washing, physical distancing and minimizing group activities, including lunch and recess.

But the experts went further than guidelines issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other groups, also calling for surgical masks to be worn by all teachers

Read More

Teachers weigh risks as COVID-19 looms

Christy Karwatt teaches social studies, but she’s been thinking more like a math teacher the last few days.

At 61, the Sarasota High teacher is entering her 27th year in Florida’s retirement system, and she loves her job. She had planned on teaching three more years to maximize her retirement payment. 

But as COVID-19 cases continue to spike across the state and the country, officials are pouring on pressure to reopen schools full time this fall.

On Monday, Florida’s education commissioner ordered the state’s schools to open full-time in August. U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos on Tuesday criticized plans to offer in-person instruction only a few days a week. And the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is reworking its guidance on reopening schools after President Donald Trump thought the guidelines were too tough. 

Early guidance from health experts: Scheduled days home, more online learning, lots of hand-washing

In the

Read More