security

Florida Bar examinees worry online testing software poses security risks

First, the state’s prospective lawyers had health concerns about taking the Florida Bar exam in the time of coronavirus. Now that the test has been moved on-line, they’re voicing worries about security issues with the software they will have to use to take the remote exam.

The high-pressure exam was moved on-line on July 1 after a Miami Herald story on the COVID-19 health concerns raised by students. A sit-down test was originally scheduled for July 28 and 29, but the Florida Board of Bar Examiners moved it to an Aug. 19 virtual format.

Now, the exam is being administered using a software platform from ILG Technologies. But, test-takers have reported complaints of the software causing data breaches and the program messing with their computers.

On Aug. 10, some Bar examinees sent a letter to the Florida Supreme Court asking them to intervene and help the FBBE find an alternative

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How Beijing’s National Security Crackdown Transformed Hong Kong in a Single Month

After Beijing enacted a sweeping national security law for Hong Kong, the city’s leader tried to allay fears of a broad crackdown on dissent by promising the measure would affect only a very small minority of people.

But throughout July, the first full month under the new legislation, the measure featured prominently in a sustained effort to quell political upheaval in the enclave, while also ushering in a transformative climate of fear and uncertainty.

The law’s provisions — which punish crimes related to secession, subversion, terrorism and collusion with foreign forces — have been used as grounds for disqualifying political candidates, arresting students over social media posts and banning common protest slogans.

The blows to the city’s democracy movement over the past few weeks have extended beyond the far-reaching law itself. Academics who are key figures in the protests were fired from their posts, police raided the office of an

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Hong Kong security law sends jitters through city’s feisty press

Hong Kong (AFP) – Hong Kong’s status as a bastion of press freedom is in crisis as authorities toughen their line against international media and fears grow about local self-censorship under the city’s sweeping new security law.

For decades the former British colony has been a shining light for journalists in Asia, lying on the fringes of an authoritarian China where the ruling Communist Party keeps a tight grip on public opinion.

The civil liberties that have stewarded the city’s success were promised to Hong Kongers for another 50 years under a deal that returned the trading hub to Chinese rule in 1997.

But Beijing’s new national security law — imposed in response to last year’s huge and sometimes violent pro-democracy protests — has sent a shiver through the financial hub’s media landscape.

“It’s a body blow. It’s the end of press freedom as we knew it in Hong Kong,”

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‘Tweet-tastrophe’? It could have been. Twitter hack reveals national security threat before election

It’s being called a “tweet-tastrophe.”

The Twitter accounts of some of the world’s biggest names were hacked Wednesday in a bitcoin scam. The FBI is investigating, and the Senate Intelligence Committee asked for a briefing.

“Tough day for us at Twitter. We all feel terrible this happened,” Jack Dorsey, the company’s CEO, tweeted.

The breach, as bad as it was – the largest in the social media company’s 14-year history – could have been much, much worse.

Had it been a foreign government looking to disrupt the election in November or bad actors looking to cause an international incident, mayhem would have ensued, Jennifer Grygiel, a communications professor at Syracuse University who studies social media, told USA TODAY.

Had the hack involved President Donald Trump’s Twitter account, @realDonaldTrump, it would have constituted an immediate threat to national security.

“Twitter is the fastest wire service we have ever known. This is

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Is TikTok a security threat? It’s complicated.

TikTok is one of the hottest apps on the planet among teens and social media addicts. But the app, owned by China’s ByteDance, is under ever-increasing scrutiny from U.S. government officials, including President Trump and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, who are threatening to ban it, claiming the app is a national security threat.

According to researchers, however, the fear of TikTok being used for some form of espionage is directly tied to the growing geopolitical tensions between the U.S. and China. It’s not that the app collects any more information than contemporaries like Facebook, experts say, but rather that TikTok has ties to China.

“I Think TikTok has been doing a lot of things very, very, very quickly to try to establish that it’s safe for Americans to use,” explained U.C. Berkeley professor Steven Weber, faculty director for the Berkeley Center for Long Term Cybersecurity. “In this political environment

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Here’s how to manage your remote worker’s device security

One of the biggest consequences of COVID-19 for enterprises beyond 2020 will be the acceleration of the trend to working the majority of the working week from home.

Already organizations were encouraged to look into it on the promise that each employee working from home would, on average, work an additional 1.4 days per month, and that there would be greater productivity due to a perceived improvement in work/life balance.

This working from home percentage was increased in an accelerated fashion due to the COVID-19 situation. With lockdown effectively mandating that most people in professional careers work from home, as we return to ‘normal’ it is likely that the dominant trend going forward will be that employees will want to continue working from home into the future. Indeed, research suggests that as much as 41 percent of employees will continue to work from home to at least some extent following

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