side

Anderson Tejeda Hits First Career Home Run from Right Side; Rangers Lose Fourth Straight

You know things are going really wrong when even the most reliable players have a rough night.

Kyle Gibson fought hard through 4 2/3 innings on Saturday night, including 37 pitches in the third inning where he allowed two runs. Nevertheless, he and the bullpen minimized the damage and kept it close to give the Rangers a chance to come back.

In the top of the seventh inning, rookie infielder Anderson Tejeda stepped up to the plate to face Seattle left-handed starter Justus Sheffield and launched a two-out, game-tying home run deep to left field. What’s more is it was Tejeda’s first career home run as a right-handed hitter. He had been exclusively a left-handed hitter throughout his professional career and just began switch-hitting in 2019.

“I wasn’t expecting that, just put it that way,” Woodward said with a smile. “I had talked to a lot of our player development

Read More

10 Online Courses That Can Help Turn a Hobby Into a Side Hustle

Click here to read the full article.

One of the side effects of COVID-19 is that millions of people across the United States (and world) are spending a lot more time at home. Even as people start responsibly hanging while sticking to the CDC’s latest guidelines, you may have some extra time on your hands that needs to be filled. If you’d like to turn that spare time into a side hustle for some extra income (or dip your toe into a new career path), your best bet is to try some online courses.

The best online learning platforms like Udemy, Masterclass, and LinkedIn Learning offer classes taught by professionals and run through an easy-to-understand syllabus you can review before signing up. Importantly, these are recorded lectures, not live classes. You can watch the entire course — which is broken down into different sections — on your web browser, or

Read More

An Upper West Side Family Affair: Feeding NYC Front-Line Workers

UPPER WEST SIDE, NY — When Mayor Bill de Blasio shut down all New York City restaurants in March except for takeout and delivery due to the coronavirus crisis, Luca Di Pietro had to make an excruciating decision.

With income all but gone, he had to lay off 95 of his 102 employees across his five Italian restaurants.

The loss of staff meant he had to close four locations and say goodbye for now to dozens of loyal employees.

Tarallucci e Vino, located on 83rd Street and Columbus Avenue on the Upper West Side, was his lone outpost to remain open — and uncertainty clouded the future of the business that he had spent nearly a decade creating.

“It was really, really difficult. We all went into survival mode,” Di Pietro told Patch.

But little did he know the turmoil of owning restaurants in the epicenter of a global pandemic

Read More

Coronavirus’s painful side effect is deep budget cuts for state and local government services

<span class="caption">Washington state cut both merit raises and instituted furloughs as it faced a projected $8.8 billion budget deficit because of the coronavirus.</span> <span class="attribution"><a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="https://www.gettyimages.com/detail/news-photo/washington-state-olympia-state-capitol-building-with-spring-news-photo/452908636?adppopup=true" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images">Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images</a></span>
Washington state cut both merit raises and instituted furloughs as it faced a projected $8.8 billion budget deficit because of the coronavirus. Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images

Nationwide, state and local government leaders are warning of major budget cuts as a result of the pandemic. One state – New York – even referred to the magnitude of its cuts as having “no precedent in modern times.”

Declining revenue combined with unexpected expenditures and requirements to balance budgets means state and local governments need to cut spending and possibly raise taxes or dip into reserve funds to cover the hundreds of billions of dollars lost by state and local government over the next two to three years because of the pandemic.

Without more federal aid or access to other sources of money (like reserve funds or borrowing), government officials have made it clear: Budget cuts will be happening in the coming

Read More