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What meeting your spouse online has in common with arranged marriage

<span class="caption">David and Elizabeth Weinlick, a Minnesota couple who began their life together through an arranged marriage </span> <span class="attribution"><a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="http://www.apimages.com/metadata/Index/Arranged-Wedding-Renewing-Vows/c700db29a86948808707a64f7ff11777/21/0" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:AP Photo/Kyle Potter">AP Photo/Kyle Potter</a></span>
David and Elizabeth Weinlick, a Minnesota couple who began their life together through an arranged marriage AP Photo/Kyle Potter

Most Americans who get married today believe they are choosing their own partners after falling in love with them. Arranged marriages, which remain common in some parts of the world, are a rarity here.

But while doing research about arranged marriages, I’ve made a surprising observation: These seemingly different kinds of matrimony may be beginning to converge.

Couples who ostensibly marry after spontaneously falling in love increasingly do that with some help from online dating services or after meeting through hookup apps. And modern arranged marriages – including my own – are becoming more like love marriages.

Going strong in India

According to some estimates, more than half of the marriages taking place around the world each year are arranged. They are the norm in India, comprising at least 90 percent

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