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Some parents want to hire tutors, start mini schools this year. Most can’t afford to.

CHICAGO – Millions of parents across the nation are facing difficult decisions about what to do with their kids this school year. But the pandemic affects every family differently, for reasons that range from their socioeconomic status to their health to the fields they work in.

Some parents are in a better position than others to ensure their children stay healthy and keep up with schoolwork, and researchers are raising questions about how the pandemic may exacerbate existing educational inequalities.

“Kids who are disproportionately low-income are at highest risk for learning losses,” said Ariel Kalil, a professor at the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy. “When these gaps in learning open up, absent some really serious and sustained intervention, the kids won’t (catch up). That will result in less academic achievement, lower lifetime earnings and even lower productivity in adulthood.”

USA TODAY spoke with more than a dozen

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Online school? Some parents want to hire tutors, start mini schools this year. Most can’t afford to.

CHICAGO – Millions of parents across the nation are facing difficult decisions about what to do with their kids this school year. But the pandemic affects every family differently, for reasons that range from their socioeconomic status to their health to the fields they work in.

Some parents are in a better position than others to ensure their children stay healthy and keep up with schoolwork, and researchers are raising questions about how the pandemic may continue to exacerbate existing educational inequalities.

“Kids who are disproportionately low-income are at highest risk for learning losses,” said Ariel Kalil, a professor at the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy. “When these gaps in learning open up, absent some really serious and sustained intervention, the kids won’t (catch up). That will result in less academic achievement, lower lifetime earnings and even lower productivity in adulthood.”

USA TODAY spoke with more than

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Stimulus can’t save schools from a chaotic start

The stimulus plan in the works on Capitol Hill will come too late for the start of the school year in much of the nation, adding to the chaos in an education system already thrown into disarray by the global pandemic.

Lawmakers are still haggling over the details of the package that would deliver a historic sum for education, as districts throughout the country prepare to kick off the school year. Education leaders are already spending money on stockpiles of face masks, computers kids can use to connect to classes at home and training for educators still learning how to make the most of teaching from afar.

But districts have no certainty from Congress about how much cash they can expect to rain down from a final stimulus deal or what rules will be attached to that money.

“It’s too late to get resources to people or schools that are

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Illinois Teachers Union Says School Year Should Start Online

WESTMONT, IL — The union representing teachers in Illinois called for the school year to begin with remote learning. A return to in-person instruction is currently too risky, according to the Illinois Federation of Teachers.

In a statement issued Monday, the statewide teachers union provided a list of 10 safety measures that every school district and college needs for its members to feel safe returning to the classroom. Too many schools cannot achieve “critical safety benchmarks,” it said.

“We arrived at this position by having talked to our members extensively about how do we do this,” Illinois Federation of Teachers President Dan Montgomery said in the statement. “Our primary concern is keeping everybody safe — not only our members, but our students, their families and their communities. At this point, our recommendation is that schools should return to online or remote learning for the beginning of the school year. It

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Solano County Students To Start New School Year Online

SOLANO COUNTY, CA — As California Gov. Gavin Newsom laid out back-to-school guidelines for K-12 students across the state Friday, saying that students in counties on the state’s coronavirus monitoring list must start the school year online, the Solano County Office of Education confirmed all K-12 students in Solano County will start the school year with distance learning.

“Previously, some Solano County school districts and charter schools made plans to reopen school campuses with varying models of social distancing, modified schedules, and distance learning options for students,” SCOE Spokeswoman Jennifer Leonard said Friday in a news release.

“However, the newly issued orders require that schools located in counties on the state’s County Monitoring List must begin the school year with distance learning from home,” Leonard said. “Solano County is currently on the state’s County Monitoring List due to recent increased in COVID-19 cases.”

As to when students in Solano and

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Douglas County To Start 2020 School Year With Online Only

DOUGLASVILLE, GA — Douglas County schools will start the fall term offering online learning only, joining a growing number of Georgia districts that plan to keep kids out of classrooms for their own safety.

School will also start a week later than originally planned — on Aug. 17 instead of Aug. 10 — to allow extra time to issue learning devices to students and for teacher preparation.

Superintendent Trent North said in an email to parents Thursday that he made the decisions “after consultation with Cobb & Douglas Public Health and careful consideration of the health and safety of students and staff.” The letter is posted to the Douglas County School System’s website.

“The school system is authorized to make this independent decision based on the Executive Order issued by Governor Brian Kemp,” North said in the email. “I will share our decision with the Georgia Department of Education.”

North

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PA Teachers Union Urges State To Plan For Online Start To School

HARRISBURG, PA — Pennsylvania’s largest teachers union is asking state officials to direct public schools to plan for an online start to school if the spread of coronavirus doesn’t slow by the fall.

SEA President Rich Askey, in a letter to Gov. Tom Wolf and Secretary of Education Pedro Rivera, said it is “extremely important for Pennsylvania’s public schools to plan for the distinct possibility that further increases in COVID-19 cases will make it impossible to safely reopen Pennsylvania’s schools for in-person instruction.

Askey, in his letter, emphasized that educators want to return to the classroom. However, health risks associated with COVID-19 “may be impossible to prevent in school buildings if the current increase in Pennsylvania cases continues.”

He pointed to an “increasing number of Pennsylvania educators and parents” who are concerned that reopening schools for in-person instruction poses significant health risks.

The full letter can be seen here.

The

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Large Sacramento suburban school district will start fall with distance learning only

The Folsom Cordova Unified School District will begin the 202-21 school year with a distance learning-only plan.

The decision, which came during a special board meeting Tuesday night, caught dozens of parents who tuned in online by surprise.

The school board voted 4-1 to have all 20,000 students in the district start the school year online.

Transitional schedules, or hybrid models where students will return two to four days a week in morning or afternoon cohorts, will be implemented as soon as it is deemed safe to return to campus.

The school district also approved a virtual academy option for students who wish to sign up for it. Charter homeschool programs are still options for families.

Many parents shared their frustrations during public comment and on Facebook groups, upset the district was eliminating all other options, including their children’s chance to physically return to campus August 12. More than 300

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Delayed Start For Polk County Public Schools: Coronavirus

WINTER HAVEN, FL — Polk County Public Schools will delay the start of the 2020-21 school year at least until Aug. 24 due to the rising transmission of coronavirus cases in the community, a news release said.

“We are trending upward with the rise of COVID-19 cases, not only in the state, but right here in Polk County,” Superintendent Jacqueline Byrd said in a news release. “At this time, I do not feel it is safe to physically reopen schools on Aug. 10. We need to delay the opening of school at least until August 24. We will continue to monitor the situation with health officials and, if the spread of the virus remains high, we can further delay the physical reopening of our brick-and-mortar schools if necessary.”

For the upcoming school year, Polk County Public Schools plans to offer three distinct learning formats, and families can choose the one

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As Trump pressures schools to reopen, California’s 2 largest school districts say they’re going to start online only in the fall

President Trump is seen outside the White House on July 11, 2020.
President Trump is seen outside the White House on July 11, 2020.

Joshua Roberts/Getty

  • The Los Angeles and San Diego unified school systems said they’ll be starting the fall semester off online in a joint statement. 

  • The announcement comes after President Donald Trump said he’d pressure states to reopen in-person classes in the fall. 

  • The two districts have a combined total of 700,000 students, according to NPR.

  • On Monday, public health officials in Los Angeles County announced 2,593 new cases of COVID-19 and 13 new deaths.

  • Other counties, like Orange County, California, voted on Monday to reopen schools without measures requiring masks or increased social distancing.

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The Los Angeles and San Diego unified school systems announced that they’ll be going online only at the start of the fall semester, according to a joint statement.

“One fact is clear: those countries that have managed

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