States

Scientists Extend Quantum States by 22 Milliseconds

  • An innovative protective noise field extends a qubit’s quantum state to 22 milliseconds.
  • With the state of a qubit 10,000 times longer than before, quantum computers could take another step toward feasibility.
  • Just 22 milliseconds is a virtual eternity for a qubit.

    Molecular engineers at the University of Chicago have found a way to extend the quantum state of a qubit to 22 milliseconds, representing a huge improvement and a window some say will make quantum computers far more feasible. The secret is an alternating magnetic field, which they say is scientifically “intricate” but easy to apply.

    🤯 You like quantum. So do we. Let’s nerd out over it together.

    Working with qubits in solid silicon carbide, the scientists extended the time in quantum state of their qubit to 22 milliseconds, which sounds small to our slow human brains, but is almost an eternity for a qubit. In fact, the

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    At least 3 dozen states have reported coronavirus cases on college campuses

    Classes have not even started at the College of the Holy Cross, in Worcester, Massachusetts, but there are growing concerns over the students’ disregard of coronavirus safety protocols. Over the weekend, campus police busted a large party at an off-campus apartment rented by Holy Cross students, eliciting growing concerns that such gatherings could turn into coronavirus super-spreader events.



    a close up of a sign: Signs at University of Colorado Boulder provide incoming freshman moving into campus with physical distancing guidelines due to the Coronavirus pandemic on Aug. 18, 2020 in Boulder, Colo.


    © Mark Makela/Getty Images
    Signs at University of Colorado Boulder provide incoming freshman moving into campus with physical distancing guidelines due to the Coronavirus pandemic on Aug. 18, 2020 in Boulder, Colo.

    “Not only did the number of people in attendance exceed the state limit on the number of people at a gathering, but attendees were not wearing masks or adhering to physical distancing guidelines,” said college administrators in a letter to the community, calling the behavior “highly irresponsible.”

    According to the school, the party has led to a potential cluster of

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    When is it safe to open schools? States have varying answers

    As schools across the U.S. decide whether to reopen this fall, many are left wondering how to know if it’s safe. Public health experts say virus rates in the community should be low, but there’s little agreement on a specific threshold or even a measurement.

    The federal government has largely left it to state and local governments to decide when it’s safe to bring students back to the classroom. The result is a patchwork of policies that vary widely by state and county. Minnesota, for example, suggests fully in-person classes if a county’s two-week case rate is no higher than 10 per 10,000 people. In Pennsylvania, it’s considered safe if a county’s positive virus tests average lower than 5% for a week.

    The uncertainty has become a source of tension among school leaders who say they are being pressured to reopen without clear guidelines on how to do it safely.

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    Student Loan Debt Should Be Canceled. Until Then, Here Are The States & Colleges With The Lowest Student Debt

    ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO – AUGUST 17: A student walks on campus classes begin amid the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic on the first day of the fall 2020 semester at the University of New Mexico on August 17, 2020 in Albuquerque, New Mexico. To help prevent the spread of COVID-19, the university has moved to a hybrid instruction model that includes a mixture of in-person and remote classes. According to the school, about 70 percent of classes are being taught online. (Photo by Sam Wasson/Getty Images)
    ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO – AUGUST 17: A student walks on campus classes begin amid the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic on the first day of the fall 2020 semester at the University of New Mexico on August 17, 2020 in Albuquerque, New Mexico. To help prevent the spread of COVID-19, the university has moved to a hybrid instruction model that includes a mixture of in-person and remote classes. According to the school, about 70 percent of classes are being taught online. (Photo by Sam Wasson/Getty Images)

    During the pandemic, it’s been hard enough to cover living expenses month to month — and it’s worse when so many of us are also saddled with college debt. There was some relief in March when the CARES Act was passed in Congress, which suspended federal student loan payments and set interest rates to 0% until September 30th initially. Recently, with no new stimulus package passed,

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    Tax-free shopping coming to 10 states with sales tax holidays this weekend. Here’s where to save.

    Shoppers in 10 states should file this away: This weekend, you can pick up clothes and school supplies tax-free.

    Sales tax holidays kick off Friday in nine states – Florida, Iowa, Missouri, New Mexico, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Texas and Virginia – and Maryland’s tax holiday begins Sunday.

    Alabama, Arkansas, Mississippi and Tennessee already held their tax holidays. Maryland and Connecticut will offer tax breaks later in August. 

    The back-to-school shopping season, the second-biggest period for retailers, behind the holidays, usually kicks off in mid-July and peaks in mid-August. This year, it’s off to a slow start amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Experts predict the shopping season will peak in late August and spill into most of September.

    Need Clorox wipes?: Disinfecting wipes shortage could last into 2021 amid coronavirus pandemic

    Drive-in movies at Walmart: Walmart launching drive-in movie theaters at 160 stores amid COVID-19. Here’s how to reserve a parking

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    The United States Is Reopening Many of the Wrong Schools

    With coronavirus cases spiking in dozens of states, the prospect of anything resembling a normal school year is fading fast.

    Schools can’t safely reopen if infections are exploding in the communities they serve.

    But in regions where the pandemic appears to be under control, it is most important to get the youngest children back into school buildings, to stop the alarming slide in their learning. Older students, especially those in college, are better equipped to cope with the difficulties of online education.

    That is the broad consensus among experts on back-to-school priorities. But, as things stand now, much of the United States is preparing to do exactly the opposite.

    In many towns, college students are more likely than kindergartners to return to school for in-person instruction. An example is my home of Ann Arbor, Michigan, where schoolchildren will be learning completely online and university students will be attending at least

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    News from around our 50 states

    Alabama

    Montgomery County Sheriff Derrick Cunningham talks about his department's budget Tuesday after meeting with the Montgomery County Commission.
    Montgomery County Sheriff Derrick Cunningham talks about his department’s budget Tuesday after meeting with the Montgomery County Commission.

    Montgomery: Montgomery County Sheriff Derrick Cunningham is expecting 10% less funding for his office in 2021 because of the financial impact of the coronavirus pandemic. He outlined a plan to deal with the cuts during a Tuesday hearing with county commissioners. Cunningham pitched some cost-saving ideas to help, including sharing the salary of a full-time dispatcher with the town of Pike Road, and building and selling cars to other municipalities. “I think we’re still making sure that the equipment and the manpower are going to be there for our community,” he said. He did have one request. He asked the commissioners for hazard pay for some of his officers. “It’s about trying to recognize those that are going over and beyond,” he said. “… These guys and girls, they love their

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    California Governor Gavin Newsom Orders Majority Of State’s Schools To Close Campuses, Move To Virtual Instruction Only; Los Angeles County Will Follow Newsom’s Lead

    Click here to read the full article.

    At his Friday news conference, California Governor Gavin Newsom ordered counties on the state’s coronavirus watch list to shut down school campuses this fall, at least to begin the school year. The 32 counties on the list — which include Los Angeles and most of Southern California — must switch to virtual instruction only. The state’s two largest districts, Los Angeles Unified and San Diego Unified, had already announced plans to begin the new academic year with online-only courses.

    The mandate applies to private as well as public schools, according to Newsom.

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    In order to physically reopen schools, counties will have to meet the state’s attestation requirements. Los Angeles, Orange, Ventura, San Diego and Riverside counties are on the watch list.

    Shortly after Newsom’s accouncement, the L.A. County Department of Public Health announced it would follow the governor’s order,

    Counties

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    Many public health experts say children should return to school in the fall, particularly in states like Maryland

    In the raging national debate over whether to reopen schools, advocates on both sides are basing their arguments on a range of factors: political, economic and emotional.

    But there is a growing consensus in the public health and scientific community that schools should resume in-person classes this fall — particularly in states such as Maryland, where cases have not spiked as they have elsewhere.

    To be sure, these experts say safety precautions will be necessary to reopen schools. But they say an assessment of risks versus benefits points to the wisdom of reopening.

    The latest available data suggests that children are less likely to become infected with the coronavirus and less likely than adults to develop severe cases. In addition, health experts say children appear not to spread the virus to family members and other adults as efficiently as flu and other common illnesses.

    While public health experts and some

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    COVID-19 Positivity Rates Appear to Be Spiking in Many States That Reopened Bars

    Michael Neff sensed what was about to happen. It was late March, and Texas had surpassed 1,000 confirmed cases of COVID-19. He braced as governor Greg Abbott announced that many businesses—including gyms, restaurants and bars—would be prohibited from serving customers indoors. The Cottonmouth Club, his Houston cocktail bar, would have to close.

    “We were resigned to the fact that we might not make it,” Neff says of his business. “We took a day to be really, really depressed and I locked myself in the bar and didn’t answer the phone.”

    Since then, Neff has tried to bring the Cottonmouth Club experience online, by livestreaming a nightly bar-themed variety show with karaoke and cocktail-themed discussions. Customers can show support by paying into a virtual tip jar. When the governor allowed bars to reopen at 25% capacity on May 22, Neff reconfigured the furniture, set up a reservation system and designed contactless

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