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Student Blockade Protests Viktor Orban’s Reach at a Top Arts University

BUDAPEST — Nearly 100 students have occupied a key building of a prestigious Hungarian university for the past week to protest what they see as a takeover of their school by the autocratic government of Prime Minister Viktor Orban, a demonstration that has become a symbol of resistance to the country’s nationalist leadership.

The protest, at the University for Theater and Film Arts in central Budapest, has drawn shows of support from theater groups, students, actors and university faculties in Hungary and around Europe since dozens of students began the effort on Monday. On Sunday, thousands of demonstrators joined the students in forming a human chain stretching from the barricaded university building to the steps of Parliament, a distance of five kilometers, or about three miles.

The protesters passed down the line a document declaring the university’s autonomy, and its arrival at the Parliament steps caused jubilation among the demonstrators.

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From Microsoft VP to law student: What this exec’s career transition says about AI and the law

Mike Angiulo, a former Microsoft vice president, is now in his third year at the University of Washington law school. (GeekWire Photo / Todd Bishop)

Mike Angiulo worked at Microsoft for 25 years as an engineering manager and vice president for products including Windows PCs, Microsoft Outlook, Xbox, Surface, and cloud and artificial intelligence technologies. But it was actually not the work Angiulo originally envisioned doing. He had planned to be a lawyer, delaying those plans after he started at Microsoft in his early 20s.

Now, at age 47, nearly three decades later, he’s circling back to his original plan — going back to school and preparing for a second career, as a lawyer focused on some of the most interesting and difficult questions facing the same types of technologies that he helped to create for so many years.

“I am a big believer that just the prevalence of big

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Department of Education sends mixed messages on transgender student protections

The Trump administration said it plans to investigate alleged discrimination against LGBTQ students following this summer’s landmark Supreme Court rulings that said sexual orientation and gender identity are protected traits under existing civil rights law — but only in certain circumstances, according to documents released by the Education Department’s Office of Civil Rights.

In updated guidance posted via a letter to various Connecticut schools, the Education Department said transgender students still can’t play on school sports teams that correspond with their gender identity and instead should be assigned to teams that correspond with their biological gender at birth.

At the same time, in a separate case, the department said it agreed to investigate claims of discrimination based on sexual orientation where a student alleged “homophobic bigot[ry]” at her school.

Sunu Chandy, the legal director at the National Women’s Law Center, said the two moves by the department are “totally at

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5 tips for making remote education a success, whether you’re a student, parent or teacher

It’s officially back-to-school season, and for many families this year that means switching gears to start the academic year remotely.

Virtual learning was new to many parents, students and teachers this spring when the COVID-19 pandemic forced schools to close, and some found the transition from in-person to online classes to be a challenge. This fall Coloradans are increasingly having to adapt to this format, as concerns about the virus keep schools from reopening and more parents opt for an educational stopgap rather than a return to traditional learning.

Armed with the right tools and strategies, any family or teacher can make it work, said Faylyn Emma, a high school math teacher at Colorado Connections Academy, which specializes in online education and serves more than 2,000 students throughout the Centennial State.

Here are five tips to making remote education a success in your household.

Build a routine

Children thrive when

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Education Department clarifies Trump executive order on student loans

Those are the same terms Congress agreed on in the last stimulus package. Lawmakers suspended education debt payments through Sept. 30 after the Trump administration in March gave borrowers the option of postponing payments for at least 60 days as the pandemic battered the economy.

As the deadline approached and Congress was unable to reach an agreement on an extension, Trump stepped in this month. But the president’s order created more questions than it gave answers about how the suspension would be applied. And by giving borrowers the option of halting their payments, rather than making the process automatic, and ignoring the treatment of loans in default, consumer advocates worried that many would fall through the cracks.

On Friday, the department addressed many of those concerns, though others remain. Chief among them is that the order still excludes more than 7 million borrowers whose federal loans are held by private

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Student newspaper at University of Kansas students slams school’s reopening plans, demands remote learning

After one week of in-person classes, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill closed its doors to stop uncontrolled spread of COVID-19. Four hotspots surfaced in student housing and a fraternity on that campus.

Make no mistake. A similar story will likely play out at the University of Kansas if it follows through on plans to bring students back to classes in person starting Monday. Already this week, other schools, such as Michigan State University and the University of Notre Dame, suspended in-person learning because of COVID-19 outbreaks.

KU hasn’t been honest in its approach to bringing students back. When the Kansan asked about the University’s testing plans, officials declined to answer for months and implemented a saliva testing system three weeks before the start of fall classes.

When the Kansan asked a routine question about how much money was left in KU’s reserves, we were told this information

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University of Pittsburgh delays in-person classes because of student partying: Today in Pa.

You can listen to the latest episode of “Today in Pa” at this link, or on your favorite app including Alexa, Apple, Google, Spotify and Stitcher. Episodes are available every weekday on PennLive. Subscribe/follow and rate the podcast via your favorite app.

The Pennsylvania Farm Show announces plans to go virtual in 2021. Meanwhile, University of Pittsburgh has to delay the start of in-person classes after reports of students partying off campus. Coronavirus restrictions mean some schools will have to play their football games in other counties. The Great Allentown Fair has a plan to help people get their fair food fix, even if the fair itself is canceled.

Those are the stories we cover in the latest episode of “Today in Pa,” a daily weekday podcast from PennLive.com and hosted by Julia Hatmaker. “Today in Pa” is dedicated to sharing the most important and interesting stories in the state.

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Student Loan Debt Should Be Canceled. Until Then, Here Are The States & Colleges With The Lowest Student Debt

ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO – AUGUST 17: A student walks on campus classes begin amid the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic on the first day of the fall 2020 semester at the University of New Mexico on August 17, 2020 in Albuquerque, New Mexico. To help prevent the spread of COVID-19, the university has moved to a hybrid instruction model that includes a mixture of in-person and remote classes. According to the school, about 70 percent of classes are being taught online. (Photo by Sam Wasson/Getty Images)
ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO – AUGUST 17: A student walks on campus classes begin amid the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic on the first day of the fall 2020 semester at the University of New Mexico on August 17, 2020 in Albuquerque, New Mexico. To help prevent the spread of COVID-19, the university has moved to a hybrid instruction model that includes a mixture of in-person and remote classes. According to the school, about 70 percent of classes are being taught online. (Photo by Sam Wasson/Getty Images)

During the pandemic, it’s been hard enough to cover living expenses month to month — and it’s worse when so many of us are also saddled with college debt. There was some relief in March when the CARES Act was passed in Congress, which suspended federal student loan payments and set interest rates to 0% until September 30th initially. Recently, with no new stimulus package passed,

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What will student protests look like when classes are online?

<span class=This fall will see a change in the ways college students participate in campus activism, experts suggest. Maddie Meyer / Staff/GettyImages” src=”https://s.yimg.com/ny/api/res/1.2/xU4GO5UTDI4onywydaPFNw–/YXBwaWQ9aGlnaGxhbmRlcjt3PTk2MDtoPTY0NC42NjY2NjY2NjY2NjY2/https://s.yimg.com/uu/api/res/1.2/HYY6SFM7ScrvDqLSFT.c7g–~B/aD05Njc7dz0xNDQwO3NtPTE7YXBwaWQ9eXRhY2h5b24-/https://media.zenfs.com/en/the_conversation_us_articles_815/e84a43c783bd1d745a35b2c342b4428a” data-src=”https://s.yimg.com/ny/api/res/1.2/xU4GO5UTDI4onywydaPFNw–/YXBwaWQ9aGlnaGxhbmRlcjt3PTk2MDtoPTY0NC42NjY2NjY2NjY2NjY2/https://s.yimg.com/uu/api/res/1.2/HYY6SFM7ScrvDqLSFT.c7g–~B/aD05Njc7dz0xNDQwO3NtPTE7YXBwaWQ9eXRhY2h5b24-/https://media.zenfs.com/en/the_conversation_us_articles_815/e84a43c783bd1d745a35b2c342b4428a”/
This fall will see a change in the ways college students participate in campus activism, experts suggest. Maddie Meyer / Staff/GettyImages

Editor’s note: Campus protests have become a mainstay in American higher education in recent years. But now that many colleges and universities will be conducting classes online due to COVID-19, the nature of college protests is likely to change. That’s according to Sam Abrams, professor of political science at Sarah Lawrence College; Jonathan Flowers, a visiting assistant philosophy professor at Worcester State University; and April Logan, professor of English literature at Salisbury University, who shared their views in the following Q&A.

How might campus protests be different this fall?

<span class=Sam Abrams is a professor of political science at Sarah Lawrence College and a visiting fellow
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How to Navigate Online College Classes as a Student With Disabilities

As the fall semester begins and students head back to class, many are doing so virtually. Colleges are taking coronavirus prevention precautions, with hundreds opting for fully or partially online classes.

But what does the shift to online classes mean for students with disabilities?

To get a sense of what lies ahead, it may be useful to look back at the spring semester, when campuses closed and classes were suddenly shifted online, forcing students with disabilities to make quick adjustments.

Lessons Learned From the Spring Semester Online

One advantage that college officials have to plan for the fall is the ability to look back on the spring of COVID-19.

“Accommodations that had been approved for (face-to-face) communication were revisited, depending on the disabled students’ needs,” Mary Lee Vance, director of services for students with disabilities at California State University–Sacramento, wrote in an email.

While “not all students experienced a need

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