students

More Than 100 Students in Greek System at University Of Washington Positive for COVID-19

Over 100 students in the University of Washington’s Greek system have reported testing positive for the coronavirus this week, amplifying concern about the reopening of colleges and universities this fall.

According to CBS News, 105 students living in 15 fraternity houses near campus this summer reported testing positive for the virus on Thursday. The county health department has verified 62 of those cases, as well as four other students who were in close contact with the residents but do not live there.

As the university continues to confirm these cases, residents are being asked to quarantine or self-isolate for the time being. None of the residents have been hospitalized.

UW did not immediately respond to PEOPLE’s request for comment.

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The first cluster was reported Tuesday, with the university sharing that at least 38 students across 10 fraternity houses were infected with the virus, NBC-affiliate KING5 reported. The number of cases nearly tripled by the end of the week.

According to the school, there are approximately 1,000 students living in 25 fraternity homes north of the UW Seattle campus.

Karen Ducey/Getty

Michelle Ma, a spokeswoman for the university, told CBS News that more than 800 students have been tested in response to the uptick in cases. Updated results are expected to be announced next week.

“Within 24 hours, we set up a site nearby the Greek houses and apartments for students to come and

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After decades of failing minority students, this school district is pushing for racial equity. Here’s how.

INDIANAPOLIS — After decades of segregation, of failing to educate and serve all students equally, of “privileging the prejudice of white parents over the well-being of Black students,” a new era has begun in Indianapolis Public Schools.

The IPS Board of School Commissioners unanimously adopted a new racial equity policy and resolution affirming that Black lives matter last week, naming the ways in which the district has failed its Black and brown students in the past and committing to doing better in the future.

It will be wide-ranging, affecting everything from how students are taught and disciplined to how teachers are hired and trained. 

The policy has been in the works for the past 18 months and wasn’t due out until later this summer, but Superintendent Aleesia Johnson said timing its adoption with the current momentum around the Black Lives Matter movement felt right.

Indianapolis Public Schools Superintendent Aleesia Johnson poses for a portrait at her Indianapolis office on Wednesday, June 17, 2020.
Indianapolis Public Schools Superintendent Aleesia Johnson poses for a portrait at her Indianapolis office on Wednesday, June 17, 2020.

Creating and adopting what she calls a “racial equity mindset” was one Johnson’s top priorities when interviewing to lead the district. The first Black woman to lead the district, she served as interim starting in January 2019 and was officially hired into the position last June.

“With the current climate, it felt right to bring it now, in June, and amplify this message and our commitment to racial equity and the work we have ahead,” Johnson said after the vote.

‘This impacts your life forever’: How one

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Saying it failed minority students for decades, school district commits to racial equity

INDIANAPOLIS — After decades of segregation, of failing to educate and serve all students equally, of “privileging the prejudice of white parents over the well-being of Black students,” a new era has begun in Indianapolis Public Schools.

The IPS Board of School Commissioners unanimously adopted a new racial equity policy and resolution affirming that Black lives matter last week, naming the ways in which the district has failed its Black and brown students in the past and committing to doing better in the future.

It will be wide-ranging, affecting everything from how students are taught and disciplined to how teachers are hired and trained. 

Indianapolis Public Schools Superintendent Aleesia Johnson poses for a portrait at her Indianapolis office on Wednesday, June 17, 2020.
Indianapolis Public Schools Superintendent Aleesia Johnson poses for a portrait at her Indianapolis office on Wednesday, June 17, 2020.

The policy has been in the works for the past 18 months and wasn’t due out until later this summer, but Superintendent Aleesia Johnson said timing its adoption with the current momentum around the Black Lives Matter movement felt right.

Creating and adopting what she calls a “racial equity mindset” was one Johnson’s top priorities when interviewing to lead the district. The first Black woman to lead the district, she served as interim starting in January 2019 and was officially hired into the position last June.

“With the current climate, it felt right to bring it now, in June, and amplify this message and our commitment to racial equity and the work we have ahead,” Johnson said after the vote.

‘This impacts your life forever’: How one

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USC reverses robust fall reopening plans, asks students to stay home for online classes

USC students are being asked to stay home and continue their education online in the fall amid the coronavirus crisis. <span class="copyright">(Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)</span>
USC students are being asked to stay home and continue their education online in the fall amid the coronavirus crisis. (Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

Amid the alarming surge in coronavirus spread, USC announced it will no longer bring all undergraduates back to campus for the fall semester and will move to mainly online classes, reversing an earlier decision to welcome students back for a hybrid model.

The decision, announced by Provost Charles Zukoski late Wednesday night, came the same day Gov. Gavin Newsom announced tougher restrictions on indoor activities. Zukoski recommended that students not return to campus for the semester and instead continue their education online.

“The once-in-a-century COVID-19 pandemic has altered every aspect of our lives — the way we interact, work, and socialize — and with each new permutation of the pandemic, we must find ways to thrive,” Zukoski wrote.

“Given the continuing safety restrictions and limited densities permissible on campus, our undergraduate students primarily or exclusively will be taking their courses online in the fall term,” he said. “On-campus housing and activities will be limited.”

Only 10 to 20% of courses during the fall semester will be conducted in person and on campus. These courses include certain labs, studios and performance classes and research studies that require hands-on work.

The new USC decision echoes UCLA’s plan for the fall to only offer 15 to 20% of courses on campus, and reflects how colleges throughout the state and nation are moving to severely limit in-person courses,

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‘Very disturbing’ racist videos posted by students in NC school system, official says

A North Carolina schools superintendent said he was “both saddened and disappointed” after students posted “very disturbing” racist videos on social media.

In a Facebook post Monday, Superintendent Matthew Stover of the Catawba County Schools said he received multiple reports of “certain students” in the district posting the videos, which he also called inappropriate and insensitive.

“I want to make it absolutely clear that Catawba County Schools does not, and will not, tolerate our students engaging in hateful speech and racist behavior on our school campuses and at school events,” Stover said in his online message addressed to students, parents and community members.

Stover titled his message, “Racist Behavior Will Not Be Tolerated.”

One of the videos shows two boys reenacting the killing of George Floyd, a Black man, by Minneapolis police, the Hickory Daily Record reported. One boy kneels on the other’s neck, and both mockingly repeat Floyd’s “I can’t breathe” words, according to the newspaper, which said it received a copy of the video from a student at St. Stephens High School in Hickory.

Stover isn’t saying what the videos show or if any students have been identified and face discipline.

The superintendent urged parents to “diligently” monitor their children’s use of social media and to educate them on “the appropriate use of social media and the harmful impact of this type of inappropriate behavior.”

“Please educate them about engaging in online communications responsibly by identifying hateful or racist speech and actions, and not posting it, “liking,” “tagging,”

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