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Teachers sue Florida governor over school reopening plan

The Florida Education Association, a union representing 145,000 educators, filed a lawsuit on Monday against Governor Ron DeSantis and the state’s Department of Education in an attempt to stop schools from reopening at the end of August. The lawsuit argues Florida’s plan to reopen schools is unsafe due to the coronavirus pandemic, and therefore violates the state constitution, CBS Miami reports.

“The Florida Constitution mandates ‘[a]dequate provision shall be made by law for a uniform, efficient, safe, secure, and high quality system of free public schools,'” the lawsuit says. “The Defendants’ unconstitutional handling of their duties has infringed upon this mandate and requires the courts to issue necessary and appropriate relief.”

The lawsuit also names Education Commissioner Richard Corcoran and Miami-Dade County Mayor Carlos Gimenez as defendants. 

“The governor needs to accept the reality of the situation here in Florida, where the virus is surging out of control,” FEA

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States sue Trump administration over college student visa rule

WASHINGTON – Seventeen states and the District of Columbia sued President Donald Trump’s administration Monday to block a new rule that would force international college students to leave United States if they’re only enrolled in online classes this fall.

Some universities are planning to offer classes entirely online because of concerns about the pandemic. The new rule could be devastating for students and universities alike. 

The lawsuit, filed by 18 attorneys general against the Department of Homeland Security, calls the new rule a “cruel, abrupt and unlawful action to expel international students amidst the pandemic that has wrought death and disruption across the United States.”

The Trump administration issued the new immigration policy last week, as it seeks to force universities and K-12 schools to reopen in the fall despite soaring COVID-19 infections across the country. The lawsuit highlights a July 6 tweet from President Trump declaring: “SCHOOLS MUST OPEN

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Republicans Want To Make Sure You Can’t Sue Your Boss If You Get Sick

With millions of workers returning to their jobs amid a still-raging coronavirus pandemic, the top Republican priority for the next big coronavirus bill is preventing them from suing their employers if they get sick.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) said Monday that his “number one” policy for a bill sometime this month is to block “an epidemic of lawsuits” against businesses, schools and health care providers from employees, customers, students and patients.

“Unless you were grossly negligent or intentionally engaging in harmful conduct, you should be protected from liability during this process,” McConnell said at an event in Kentucky, claiming there has been a surge of lawsuits relating to the pandemic.  

“There’s an army of trial lawyers out there ready to take advantage of the situation,” McConnel said. “We cannot get back to normal if we have an epidemic of lawsuits.”

McConnell’s push to shield businesses from liability claims

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Harvard, MIT sue to block ICE rule on international students

BOSTON (AP) — Colleges and universities pushed back Wednesday against the Trump administration’s decision to make international students leave the country if they plan on taking classes entirely online this fall, with Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology filing a lawsuit to try to block it, and others promising to work with students to keep them on campus.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement notified colleges Monday that international students will be forced to leave the U.S. or transfer to another college if their schools operate entirely online this fall. New visas will not be issued to students at those schools, and others at universities offering a mix of online and in-person classes will be barred from taking all of their classes online.

The guidance says international students won’t be exempt even if an outbreak forces their schools online during the fall term.

In a statement, the U.S. State

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