surges

Samsung crafts India comeback as anti-China wave surges

By Sankalp Phartiyal and Heekyong Yang

NEW DELHI/SEOUL (Reuters) – Samsung Electronics Co Ltd is forging a comeback in India’s smartphone market with a new range of budget devices and a ramped-up online presence, aiming to recoup ground ceded to Chinese rivals such as Xiaomi Corp.

Samsung, the only major non-Chinese player in the country, has already begun to gain ground, and a surge in anti-China sentiment in India following a border clash in June is expected to provide a fresh boost.

Samsung jumped to the No. 2 spot with 26% market share in the second quarter behind Xiaomi’s 29%, according to tech researcher Counterpoint, as the South Korean company’s diverse and inhouse supply chain helped it avoid product delays suffered by rivals during coronavirus lockdowns.

It was in third position with a 16% share in the previous quarter.

Once the unrivalled leader in the world’s second-biggest smartphone market, Samsung

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Cost, hassle of stamps questioned as mail-in voting surges

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Even if it weren’t for her disability and fear of catching COVID-19, Delinda Bryant said getting the necessary postage to cast a ballot this year will be a struggle.

Bryant, 63, doesn’t have $10 for a book of stamps, a printer to make them at home or a working car.

“My car needs its transmission fixed, but my utilities are so high I can’t afford it,” the south Georgia woman said in testimony for a federal voting rights lawsuit. “Ten dollars for a book of stamps is a hardship.”

As more states embrace mail-in voting amid the coronavirus pandemic, the often overlooked detail of postage has emerged as a partisan dividing line.

Questions over whether postage will be required for absentee ballot applications and the actual ballots, who pays for it and what happens to envelopes without stamps are the subject of lawsuits and statehouse political

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Connecticut preparing for all schools to open, but state planning for online education if COVID-19 surges. Final decision will be made in a month, Gov. Lamont says.

Connecticut is preparing for three different scenarios for the opening of schools and a final decision on how education will look will be made in a month, Gov. Ned Lamont said Monday.

Educators and the state are planning for all learning to take place in schools, but that could be modified to a mix of online and in-class learning or, if there is a coronavirus surge, all education will shift to at-home learning.

“Things change,‘’ Gov. Lamont said at his afternoon COVID-19 briefing, noting that San Diego and Los Angeles decided Monday to shift to an online learning model. “We still have very low metrics compared to San Diego and Los Angeles and most of these other states.”

How schools look “is going to be subject to where we are a month from now,‘’ Lamont said.

Fran Rabinowitz, executive director of the Connecticut Assoociation of Public School Superintendents, said that

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