survive

Indigenous Mexicans turn inward to survive COVID-19, barricading villages and growing their own food

<span class="caption">Zapotec farmers return from their 'milpa,' the garden plots that provide much of the communities' food, in Oaxaca, Mexico. </span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">Jeffrey H. Cohen</span>, <a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:CC BY-SA">CC BY-SA</a></span>
Zapotec farmers return from their ‘milpa,’ the garden plots that provide much of the communities’ food, in Oaxaca, Mexico. Jeffrey H. Cohen, CC BY-SA

While the coronavirus hammers Mexico, some Indigenous communities in the southern Mexican state of Oaxaca are finding creative ways to cope.

Oaxaca, one of Mexico’s poorest and most ethnically diverse states, is home to numerous Indigenous communities, including the Zapotec people. I have spent many years in the central valleys of Oaxaca conducting anthropological research in rural Zapotec villages, documenting the people’s lives, migration patterns and food culture.

Map of Mexico showing Oaxaca
Map of Mexico showing Oaxaca

Now, my summer research in Oaxaca canceled due to the pandemic, I am learning from afar how the Zapotec are confronting the coronavirus given such complicating factors as chronic poverty, inadequate health care, limited internet, language barriers and a lack of running water.

Working with colleagues at Mexico’s Universidad Tecnológica de los

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Many Companies Won’t Survive the Pandemic. Amazon Will Emerge Stronger Than Ever

The pandemic has upended businesses across the world, but it has been very good for Amazon. Every lockdown “click to purchase” nudged the company a little further toward utter domination of online shopping as total e-commerce sales nearly doubled in May. But if bigger was better for everyone, Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos would not be appearing before Congress on Wednesday for an antitrust hearing.

Charlene Anderson, and sellers like her, are one reason why he’ll be there. Anderson is among the many merchants who sell goods on Amazon — and who together account for more than half of sales on the site. But they pay, too: Amazon charges Anderson a $39.99 monthly fee to post her knitting and craft supplies on its site, and it takes a cut of about 30 percent on each item she sells. Anderson’s seller experience has worsened during the pandemic as Amazon exercised

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Campus Housing Owner Can Survive Digital Migration, Analysts Say

(Bloomberg) — Analysts expect American Campus Communities Inc. will still be able to attract students to off-campus housing even as pandemic fears prompt more U.S. universities to switch to online or hybrid classes.

“Kids want the college experience, and they don’t want to sit at home,” Piper Sandler analyst Alex Goldfarb said in an interview. “They want to be at school with their friends.”

The debate around how to structure higher education this fall is critical for American Campus, which runs housing properties on and near colleges. Goldman Sachs estimates that more than 45% of its revenue comes from universities in Texas, Arizona and Florida — which have all been recent hotspots for Covid-19.

Universities face immense pressure to reopen to offset the negative financial impact from missed tuition and sports revenue. As of July 19, more than half of U.S. colleges are still planning in-person classes for the fall

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First gentrification, now a pandemic. Can Highland Park’s fabled music scene survive?

Rappcats record shop in Highland Park, which has survived amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Other neighborhood stores have not been as fortunate. <span class="copyright">(Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times)</span>
Rappcats record shop in Highland Park, which has survived amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Other neighborhood stores have not been as fortunate. (Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times)

On March 7, Ryan Pollie threw the inaugural Highland Park Folk Festival, a free concert and comedy show held under the winsome tree canopy at Tierra de la Culebra Park. The show from the singer-songwriter (a resident of next-door Eagle Rock, and signed to powerhouse L.A. indie ANTI- Records) drew around 300 people to see more than a dozen local acts and comedians.

It was, as the 31-year-old Pollie described, “one of the best days of my life, that a show like that could be feasible in one of the most beautiful places to live in the world.”

Just four days later though, COVID-19 hit and local music got walloped. “There was no sense of what was coming. We had no idea of

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When a university closes for COVID-19, its college town may not survive

AMHERST, Mass. — For more than a century, the office supply store A.J. Hastings has opened its doors to the public every day without fail, a community staple in a quintessential college town.

That streak endured through the 1918 flu and world wars, national holidays and even a move. “Through thick and thin,” said Sharon Povinelli, who co-owns the store with her wife, Mary Broll.

Located in the heart of Amherst, the store has been a mainstay for students at Amherst College and Hampshire College, and the flagship campus of the University of Massachusetts.

“We’ve been here almost as long as the universities here,” Povinelli said.

The third-generation-owned business never broke its opening streak — until the coronavirus pandemic hit. A.J. Hastings, along with millions of other businesses across the country, closed in March to curb the spread of COVID-19, while colleges shut down their campuses and turned to remote

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COVID-19 turned college towns into ghost towns and businesses are struggling to survive

AMHERST, Mass. — For more than a century, the office supply store A.J. Hastings has opened its doors to the public every day without fail, a community staple in a quintessential college town.

That streak endured through the 1918 flu and world wars, national holidays and even a move. “Through thick and thin,” said Sharon Povinelli, who co-owns the store with her wife, Mary Broll.

Located in the heart of Amherst, the store has been a mainstay for students at Amherst College and Hampshire College, and the flagship campus of the University of Massachusetts.

“We’ve been here almost as long as the universities here,” Povinelli said.

The third-generation-owned business never broke its opening streak — until the coronavirus pandemic hit. A.J. Hastings, along with millions of other businesses across the country, closed in March to curb the spread of COVID-19, while colleges shut down their campuses and turned to remote

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