System

Failing test and trace system to be scaled back

Boris Johnson takes aim on a visit to a school in Upminster, Essex - Lucy Young/Evening Standard/PA
Boris Johnson takes aim on a visit to a school in Upminster, Essex – Lucy Young/Evening Standard/PA

Troubled test and trace system to be scaled back

The failing test and trace system will be scaled back nationally under new plans to put more “boots on the ground” to stop the spread of coronavirus. Council workers will be told to knock on the doors of people who fail to respond to calls warning them that they have been in contact with positive virus cases. The major overhaul follows warnings that the safe reopening of schools depends on improvements in efforts to test and track the virus. Health Editor Laura Donnelly has the details, which come amid mounting fears of a fresh Covid-19 surge. The UK has recorded its largest rise in new cases since the end of June, with a total of 1,062 people testing positive for Covid-19 in a single

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Dr. Anthony Fauci calls US plateau of cases ‘unacceptable’; Beirut explosion devastates ‘struggling’ health system

Days after President Donald Trump defended his administration’s “incredible” handling of the coronavirus outbreak in a widely viewed interview, the nation’s top health official called the country’s response “disparate” and “not as well suited” to the dynamics of the pandemic.

“What happened when the rubber hit the road on this, and we did get hit, we had the kind of response that was not as well suited to what the dynamics of this outbreak is,” Dr. Anthony Fauci said during a Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health forum Wednesday. “What happened is, we had a bit of a disparate response.”

The country’s response has allowed the daily COVID-19 case count to plateau at an “unacceptable level,” Fauci said, warning that the U.S. will continue to “smolder” without a unified effort to stop the virus. 

Here are some significant developments:

  • A deadly explosion that rocked Lebanon’s capital city of Beirut

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More than 1,000 aspiring surgeons couldn’t take a critical online exam after the system failed. Now they’re left worried it may never happen.

surgeon
surgeon

HRAUN/Getty Images

  • An exam taken by surgeons in the US saw its online system fail Thursday, leaving more than 1,000 aspiring surgeons in the dark on when — or if — they will take the test.

  • The test is a critical and costly part of transitioning from medical resident to a board-certified surgeon. 

  • The American Board of Surgery runs the tests and used a virtual proctor company called Proctortrack to give the test. 

  • Four aspiring surgeons told Business Insider they were frustrated with the lack of transparency and incompetence from the organization. The unknown delay could make it difficult for them to take the exam later, which requires weeks of intense studying beforehand.

  • “I have to start working,” one said. “I don’t have the financial security to sit back for a month and not be paid.”

  • For more stories like this, sign up here for our healthcare newsletter, Dispensed.

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More than 1,000 aspiring surgeons couldn’t take a critical online exam after the system failed. Now, they’re left worried if it’ll ever happen.

surgeon
surgeon

HRAUN/Getty Images

  • An exam taken by surgeons in the US saw its online system fail Thursday, leaving more than 1,000 aspiring surgeons in the dark on when — or if — they will take the test.

  • The test is a critical and costly part of transitioning from medical resident to a board-certified surgeon. 

  • The American Board of Surgery runs the tests and used a virtual proctor company called Proctortrack to give the test. 

  • Four aspiring surgeons, speaking anonymously to Business Insider, said they are frustrated with the lack of transparency and incompetence from the organization. The unknown delay could make it difficult for them to take the exam later, which requires weeks of intense studying beforehand.

  • “I have to start working,” one said. “I don’t have the financial security to sit back for a month and not be paid.”

  • For more stories like this, sign up here for our

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LA school system says school year will begin remotely in August

Two security guards talk on the campus of the closed McKinley School, part of the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) system, in Compton, California, just south of Los Angeles: (2020 Getty Images)
Two security guards talk on the campus of the closed McKinley School, part of the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) system, in Compton, California, just south of Los Angeles: (2020 Getty Images)

The Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) has announced that remote learning will continue in August, as the state re-shuts down amid rising coronavirus cases.

LAUSD superintendent, Austin Beutner, sent a letter out to parents in the city on Monday confirming that classes will resume online next month.

“We made the decision to close school facilities before there was any occurrence of the virus at our schools, and this proved to be the right call,” Mr Beutner said.

“Science was our guide then, and it will continue to be. Unfortunately, Covid-19 continues to spread in the Los Angeles area and the virus is going to impact how we start the new school year.”

The district is the

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Howard school system contemplates what fall reopening could look like

The clock is ticking for school districts across the country to decide what school will look like in the fall amid the coronavirus pandemic, and Howard County is no exception.

In Maryland, school systems have until Aug. 14 to submit their plans to the Maryland State Department of Education. The Howard County Public School System, which has been considering several options this summer, is planning to send its plans to the state soon after presenting them to the Howard County Board of Education on Thursday.

The plans include three options for the 2020-21 school year, specifically the fall semester.

The first option, which Superintendent Michael Martirano said is the least likely, is all students returning to the classroom as normal. The second is an all-online model that would include more instruction and video time with teachers, while the third plan is a hybrid model with some in-person classes and some

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After pushback from professors, Georgia university system will require masks after all

The University System of Georgia will now require face masks on campus as schools plan to welcome back students this fall.

As COVID-19 cases continue to trend in the wrong direction, the USG says it will require students, faculty, staff and visitors to wear a face covering inside campus buildings. Mask use will be in addition to, and not a substitute for safe social distancing, the system said Monday.

“Anyone not using a face covering when required will be asked to wear one or must leave the area,” according to a news release. “Repeated refusal to comply with the requirement may result in discipline through the applicable conduct code for faculty, staff or students.”

The new policy takes effect July 15, and excludes areas such as dorm rooms, enclosed offices and suites.

The move comes amid mounting pushback from hundreds of Georgia Tech professors, who, in a strongly worded letter,

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American Public University System Selects Dr. Wade Dyke as President

Former President of Kaplan University and CEO of Great Hearts Academies to Lead APUS Forward

Charles Town, WV, July 09, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — American Public University System (APUS), a leader in providing affordable, inclusive, quality online higher education to military, veteran and service-minded communities, announced today that it has selected Dr. Wade Dyke as president, effective August 12, 2020.

General Alfred M. Gray, USMC (Ret), Chairman of the APUS Board of Trustees and the 29th Commandant of the Marine Corps, said that Dr. Dyke is the clear choice to lead the university forward. “We have the strongest confidence in Wade’s ability to lead our organization as we move into a new era of learning innovation and growth,” said General Gray. “Dr. Dyke clearly understands the need to provide academic excellence to our adult learners and to foster student success and recognizes the immense value of our learning platform,

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