tech

Spring Valley Resident Works To keep Tech In Students’ Hands

SPRING VALLEY, NY—Schools and students in Hudson Valley rely on technology now more than ever, but technology is not always reliable or widely available. This summer, Jerry Registre, a Google intern from Spring Valley, is undertaking a critical project to help schools keep technology in the hands of their students.

As a summer intern for Google, Registre, a rising senior at Harvard College majoring in biology and computer science, is looking for ways to make it easier for schools to repair Chromebooks – a necessity for today’s learning experience, whether in the classroom or virtual. He is also encouraging students to engage with hands-on STEM and hardware learning opportunities.

“I have a sense that students on the whole are more technical now, in the realms of having more opinions about technology, knowing how different systems work, and getting better at fixing problems,” Registre told Patch. “And I think that Google,

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Big Tech Emperors Parade Their Earnings Power

(Bloomberg Opinion) — What timing. On Wednesday, the CEOs of four of the biggest U.S. technology companies downplayed the market power of their respective firms in a landmark antitrust hearing before a House subcommittee. Then just a day later, the same companies posted blowout earnings that demonstrated why they are the envy of world — and the target of scrutiny.

Late Thursday, Apple Inc., Amazon.com Inc., Facebook Inc. and Google parent Alphabet Inc. all reported better-than-expected financial results, with each generating billions of dollars in earnings for the June quarter. The numbers showed the resilience of their respective businesses, illustrating how these behemoths can generate large profit pools amid a pandemic. The four companies’ stocks spiked higher in after-hours trading, adding to their healthy gains this year.Apple made the most money out of the bunch, posting a net profit of $11.3 billion and generating $59.7 billion in revenue for its

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Stock futures jump after Big Tech reports blowout earnings

Stock futures rose Thursday evening, with contracts on the Nasdaq jumping more than 100 points, or 1%, after a slew of better than expected corporate earnings results from major tech firms.

After market close, tech titans Facebook (FB), Amazon (AMZN), Apple (AAPL), and Alphabet (GOOG, GOOGL), each reported quarterly results that blew past estimates, affirming these companies’ pandemic-era dominance following a steep run-up in tech stocks over the past couple months.

Facebook grew its revenue 11% over last year as its advertising business remained resilient despite the pandemic-related slowdown across the broader ad industry. Alphabet’s ad business was hit more prominently by that trend, with Google ad revenue falling 8% over last year, though Alphabet’s overall top- and bottom-line results still topped estimates. Facebook’s daily active users jumped 13% to 1.79 billion and monthly active users rose 12% to 2.7% billion as the pandemic drove online engagement, though the company

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Another Driver of Tech ETF Rally

We are currently in one of the busiest shopping seasons of the year – Back to School. Every year, retailers are benefited from the start of the school year, but this year the shopping trend is likely to be a little different thanks to the coronavirus pandemic.

As per the National Retail Federation (NRF), back-to-school spending is likely to be an average $789.49 per family, surpassing the previous record of $696.70 last year. Spending is expected to total $33.9 billion, up from $26.2 billion last year and topping the record of $30.3 billion set in 2012.

Majority of the outlays would be made on tech products as the school year will likely begin primarily with remote learning. According to the survey done by NRF, 63% of K-12 families look to buy computers and other electronics this year, up from 54%last year, and they expect to shell out more at an

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Colleges Tap Tech to Calm Students Paying for Remote Classes

(Bloomberg) — Colleges are rolling out new technology for a mostly online semester that begins next month, but these efforts are unlikely to impress students paying tens of thousands of dollars for in-person instruction.

The University of Michigan will provide stronger Wi-Fi and new cloud storage accounts to help students learn on campus while maintaining social distance. The University of Southern California plans virtual 3-D labs for some science courses, while the University of California at Berkeley is giving laptops, webcams and headphones to thousands of students in need.

As the Covid-19 pandemic rages across the U.S., many schools are making permanent plans to conduct classes virtually this fall. Administrators heeded complaints about lockdown learning during the previous semester and are tapping technology to try to improve the experience. Students doubt e-learning will pass what is shaping up to be the industry’s toughest test yet.

“Online classes kinda suck and

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The Canadian tech champion taking on Amazon

When the pandemic forced Pizza Pilgrims to close its 13 stores in London and Oxford in March, the business went from making 30,000 pizzas every week to zero. Of the 276 staff, 270 had to be furloughed.

While they opened one store in April to manage delivery, founder Thom Elliot still needed to find another way to make up for the lost revenue. “I tried to think of something that would serve our customers, who kept calling us, and also keep us relevant during these times,” he says in an interview.

Mr Elliot and his team decided to create pizza kits featuring all the raw ingredients you need to make your own pizza at home, but to do that he needed to upgrade his website. That’s where Shopify came in.

The Canadian company offers the technology for anyone to create an online store and sell their products, with added features

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Shopify; The Canadian tech champion taking on Amazon

When the pandemic forced Pizza Pilgrims to close its 13 stores in London and Oxford in March, the business went from making 30,000 pizzas every week to zero. Of the 276 staff, 270 had to be furloughed.

While they opened one store in April to manage delivery, founder Thom Elliot still needed to find another way to make up for the lost revenue. “I tried to think of something that would serve our customers, who kept calling us, and also keep us relevant during these times,” he says in an interview.

Mr Elliot and his team decided to create pizza kits featuring all the raw ingredients you need to make your own pizza at home, but to do that he needed to upgrade his website. That’s where Shopify came in.

The Canadian company offers the technology for anyone to create an online store and sell their products, with added features

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The tech giant you may have never heard of

When the pandemic forced Pizza Pilgrims to close its 13 stores in London and Oxford in March, the business went from making 30,000 pizzas every week to zero. Of the 276 staff, 270 had to be furloughed.

While they opened one store in April to manage delivery, founder Thom Elliot still needed to find another way to make up for the lost revenue. “I tried to think of something that would serve our customers, who kept calling us, and also keep us relevant during these times,” he says in an interview.

Mr Elliot and his team decided to create pizza kits featuring all the raw ingredients you need to make your own pizza at home, but to do that he needed to upgrade his website. That’s where Shopify came in.

The Canadian company offers the technology for anyone to create an online store and sell their products, with added features

Read More

Tech adapts to fit new business needs

When employees at the 3D bioprinting company Cellink went back to the office Monday after nearly five months, they were required to clip a small piece of Bluetooth technology onto their clothes before walking through the office’s front doors.

The devices, made by the Austrian company Safedi, are intended to make sure people are socially distancing in the office. A green light shines when people are at least six feet apart.

A red light flashes and the device emits a noise when people get too close.

“Safedi has already shown its value in just one day, especially when it’s time for those coffee breaks,” Cellink CEO Erik Gatenholm said.

The devices are one example of the varied and sometimes bizarre tech-infused solutions businesses are using in an effort to get their employees back to work and offer their customers a safe environment amid the ongoing outbreaks of the coronavirus in

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Businesses turn to tech as they reopen

When employees at the 3D bioprinting company Cellink went back to the office Monday after nearly five months, they were required to clip a small piece of Bluetooth technology onto their clothes before walking through the office’s front doors.

The devices, made by the Austrian company Safedi, are intended to make sure people are socially distancing in the office. A green light shines when people are at least six feet apart.

A red light flashes and the device emits a noise when people get too close.

“Safedi has already shown its value in just one day, especially when it’s time for those coffee breaks,” Cellink CEO Erik Gatenholm said.

The devices are one example of the varied and sometimes bizarre tech-infused solutions businesses are using in an effort to get their employees back to work and offer their customers a safe environment amid the ongoing outbreaks of the coronavirus in

Read More