Thousands

Why a business education shouldn’t cost you thousands of dollars

Why a business education shouldn't cost you thousands of dollars
Why a business education shouldn’t cost you thousands of dollars

TL;DR: Work on your business skills without going back to school with the Complete 2020 MBA Hacker bundle for $39.99, a 98% savings as of Aug. 13.

Sure, building a successful business requires financial investment. But all the money in the world can’t buy you success. And while business school can certainly show you the ropes in a big way, it can also put you into debt fast.

Why not find a happy medium? The Complete 2020 MBA Hacker Bundle will help you develop the skills to make it in the business world with online coursework and lectures that you can explore on your own time. Think about this: about 80% of small businesses survive their first year, but that number drops precipitously in the years following. This training can help make sure you don’t fall in the latter statistic.

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What we know about the massive explosion in Beirut that killed at least 135, injured thousands

Residents of Beirut are surveying the damage Wednesday after a massive explosion rocked the Lebanese capital, killing at least 135 people, wounding thousands and causing widespread damage. 

Videos shared online showed a dark cloud rising from the port, what normally might be expected from an industrial-area fire, followed by an explosion creating a massive white cloud that enveloped the area. A moment later, the shock wave hit.

As residents of the city search for missing relatives, bandage their wounds and retrieve what’s left of their homes, the Lebanese government said it is putting an unspecified number of Beirut port officials under house arrest pending an investigation and declared a two-week “state of emergency,” effectively giving the military full powers during this time.

‘Still covered in blood’: Beirut, Lebanon, searches for survivors of massive explosion

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How many people

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What we know about the massive explosion in Beirut that killed at least 100, injured thousands

Residents of Beirut are surveying the damage Wednesday after a massive explosion rocked the Lebanese capital, killing at least 100 people, wounding thousands and causing widespread damage.

The blast, which struck shortly after 6 p.m. local time with the force of a 3.5 magnitude earthquake, according to Germany’s geosciences center GFZ, followed a fire that broke out in the city’s port area, based on multiple videos from the scene. 

Videos shared online showed a dark. cloud rising from the port, what normally might be expected from an industrial-area fire, followed by an explosion creating a massive white cloud that enveloped the area. A moment later, the shock wave hit.

‘Horror show’: Massive explosion in Beirut kills at least 100, injures 4,000

How many people were killed?

At least 100 people were killed and more than 4,000 wounded, according to an official with the Lebanese Red Cross, George Kettaneh, who also

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Thousands of you told us you want California to change. We want to hear from even more of you

The 110 Freeway leads south toward downtown Los Angeles. <span class="copyright">(Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)</span>
The 110 Freeway leads south toward downtown Los Angeles. (Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)

It was almost three months ago, but it might as well have been another epoch: In early May, the L.A. Times Opinion section asked readers to envision life in California after the pandemic and share with us their thoughts on what the COVID-19 health and economic crisis reveals about us as a society, and what transformations may be necessary to heal the trauma.

And respond our readers did — more than 3,700 of you. With such a large volume of responses, the topics covered were diverse, but there were some areas of broad agreement among our readers — namely, that government should expand its role in healthcare and the economy to prevent a crisis such as COVID-19 from causing so much shock. Traffic, housing and the environment were also on the top of readers’ minds;

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A tool that unmasks child porn offenders led to thousands of arrests. Now it’s expanding.

BOCA RATON, Fla. — In December 2016, law enforcement agents seized computers and hard drives from the home of Tay Christopher Cooper, a retired high school history teacher, in Carlsbad, California. On the devices, digital forensic experts found more than 11,600 photos and videos depicting child sexual abuse, according to court documents.

Among the videos was one showing a man raping a toddler girl, according to a criminal complaint.

“The audio associated with this video is that of a baby crying,” the complaint states.

Police were led to Cooper’s door by a forensic tool called Child Protection System, which scans file-sharing networks and chatrooms to find computers that are downloading photos and videos depicting the sexual abuse of prepubescent children. The software, developed by the Child Rescue Coalition, a Florida-based nonprofit, can help establish the probable cause needed to get a search warrant.

Cooper had used one of the file-sharing

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Thousands of Baltimore teens to start summer jobs Monday in YouthWorks program upended by coronavirus pandemic

When Kalen Jones worked as a patient advocate last summer, his job was what you’d expect: visit with sick and injured people, ask about their experiences and witness the hustle and bustle of a hospital from behind the scenes.

The 16-year-old will report Monday for another summer’s duty, one of 4,500 teens in Baltimore’s YouthWorks program. But this year, he and the other young people will navigate the unpredictable terrain of work life in the coronavirus era.

Kalen, a rising junior at Baltimore Polytechnic Institute, said he does not know what to expect when he boots up his computer for his first remote shift at the University of Maryland Medical Center’s Midtown Campus.

“It has been a little complicated. But it is still a great opportunity I can take to prepare myself for the future,” said Kalen, who is thinking about a career as a surgeon.

While many cities, including

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Fate Of Thousands Of International College Students In CT Unclear

NEW HAVEN, CT —Some 14,000 international students were enrolled in Connecticut colleges in 2019. It was announced by the Trump Administration last week that those students must attend in-person classes or risk losing their visas.

The U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) ordered Monday that visa-holding international students at schools where classes are online due to the pandemic will lose their visas and “must depart the country” or “face immigration consequences, including, but not limited to, the initiation of removal proceedings.”

Now, a number of Connecticut colleges and universities are pushing back.

“That policy is senseless and cruel,” said Yale Law School Dean Heather K. Gerken. “It forces students, faculty, and institutions to make a terrible choice, and it creates the possibility that students might have to leave the country at the height of a pandemic simply because public health conditions require a university to go online.”

Many schools plan

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