Trump

Donald Trump vs. Joe Biden: Where they stand on COVID, education and more

Amid the tumult of the 2020 presidential campaign, one dynamic has remained constant: The Nov. 3 election offers voters a choice between substantially different policy paths.

President Donald Trump, like many fellow Republicans, holds out tax reductions and regulatory cuts as economic imperatives and frames himself as a conservative champion in the culture wars. The president has offered few details about how he would pull the levers of government in a second term. His most consistent argument focuses on stopping Democratic opponent Joe Biden and his party from pushing U.S. policy leftward.

Biden, for his part, is not the socialist caricature depicted by Trump. But he is every bit a center-left Democrat who frames the federal government as the force to combat the coronavirus, rebuild the economy and address centuries of institutional racism and systemic inequalities. The former vice president and U.S. senator also offers his deal-making past as evidence

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Trump says $5 billion from TikTok deal would cover history project

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The owner of TikTok has chosen Oracle over Microsoft as its American tech partner. Managing Director at Wedbush Securities Dan Ives said the deal will allow the popular video-sharing app to continue operating in the US. (Sept. 14)

AP Domestic

President Donald Trump has signed off on a business proposal between TikTok, Walmart and Oracle that would allow the social networking app to continue to operate in the U.S.

One of Trump’s stipulations for approving the deal was a $5 billion commitment from the companies to create an education initiative that teaches children America’s “real history,” the President said. 

Trump first mentioned the education fund on Saturday as he left the White House for a campaign rally in North Carolina. “We’re going to be setting up a very large fund for the education of American youth,” Trump told reporters as he announced “conceptually” signing off on the TikTok venture.

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President Trump talked to Big Ten about starting fall football season

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President Donald Trump says he is offering his assistance to the Big Ten as the conference attempts to make plans for starting its college football season. 

The president tweeted Tuesday that he had spoken to Big Ten commissioner Kevin Warren and had a “productive conversation.”

“Had a very productive conversation with Kevin Warren, Commissioner of the Big Ten Conference, about immediately starting up Big Ten football,” the tweet said. “Would be good (great!) for everyone – Players, Fans, Country. On the one yard line!”

The Big Ten announced Aug. 11 that it would not play in the fall and instead attempt to hold a football season in the spring. However, there has been significant pushback from coaches and parents after the decision. A report last week said the league was considering a start on the week of Thanksgiving.

A court filing as part of a lawsuit filed by

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Education Department clarifies Trump executive order on student loans

Those are the same terms Congress agreed on in the last stimulus package. Lawmakers suspended education debt payments through Sept. 30 after the Trump administration in March gave borrowers the option of postponing payments for at least 60 days as the pandemic battered the economy.

As the deadline approached and Congress was unable to reach an agreement on an extension, Trump stepped in this month. But the president’s order created more questions than it gave answers about how the suspension would be applied. And by giving borrowers the option of halting their payments, rather than making the process automatic, and ignoring the treatment of loans in default, consumer advocates worried that many would fall through the cracks.

On Friday, the department addressed many of those concerns, though others remain. Chief among them is that the order still excludes more than 7 million borrowers whose federal loans are held by private

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Texas surpasses staggering 10K deaths; Florida tourism drops by 60.5%; grieving daughter blasts Trump at DNC

A woman whose father died from the coronavirus blamed President Donald Trump and his administration in a fiery speech during the first night of the four-day Democratic National Convention. 

And, clusters of COVID-19 have led the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill to suddenly pivot to online classes a week after welcoming students back on campus. The university’s football team, however, still plans to play this fall.

And Texas surpassed 10,000 confirmed coronavirus deaths Monday, a new report shows that U.S. nursing homes are seeing a surge in infections and a steep rise in deaths.

Some significant developments:

  • A group of researchers from the University of Southern California tracked the common order of how COVID-19 symptoms progress in a new study. It usually starts with fever, followed by a cough.

  • Cotton mask or neck fleece? Check out how effective these 15 different kinds of masks are.

  • Nursing homes see an all-time

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‘Nero Fiddled While Rome Burned. Trump Golfs.’

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) launched into a pointed critique of Donald Trump during his online address Monday at the Democratic National Convention, comparing the president to the Roman emperor Nero, who legend has played the fiddle while his city burned.

“This president is not just a threat to our democracy, but, by rejecting science, he has put our lives and health in jeopardy,” Sanders said, referring to the COVID-19 epidemic. “Trump has attacked doctors and scientists trying to protect us from the pandemic while refusing to take strong action to produce the masks, gowns and gloves our health care workers desperately need. Nero fiddled while Rome burned. Trump golfs. His actions fanned this pandemic resulting in over 170,000 deaths and a nation still unprepared to protect its people.”

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Trump admits he’s blocking postal cash to stop mail-in votes

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump frankly acknowledged Thursday that he’s starving the U.S. Postal Service of money in order to make it harder to process an expected surge of mail-in ballots, which he worries could cost him the election.

In an interview on Fox Business Network, Trump explicitly noted two funding provisions that Democrats are seeking in a relief package that has stalled on Capitol Hill. Without the additional money, he said, the Postal Service won’t have the resources to handle a flood of ballots from voters who are seeking to avoid polling places during the coronavirus pandemic.

“If we don’t make a deal, that means they don’t get the money,” Trump told host Maria Bartiromo. “That means they can’t have universal mail-in voting; they just can’t have it.”

Trump’s statements, including the false claim that Democrats are seeking universal mail-in voting, come as he is searching for a

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Baseless birther attack on Kamala Harris shows how Trump is struggling to define her

Joe Biden's selection of Kamala Harris as his running mate has left President Trump and his allies struggling to find a consistent response. <span class="copyright">(Jeff Chiu / Associated Press)</span>
Joe Biden’s selection of Kamala Harris as his running mate has left President Trump and his allies struggling to find a consistent response. (Jeff Chiu / Associated Press)

President Trump amplified a false claim Thursday that California-born Kamala Harris might be ineligible to serve as vice president, a smear that recalls the racist “birther” campaign he waged against former President Obama.

It marked a new turn in Trump’s scattershot response to Democratic rival Joe Biden’s selection of Harris as his running mate. Trump and his allies have careened through a jumble of contradictory attacks on the California senator’s ideology, demeanor and background, using well-worn sexist and racist tropes. Harris is the first Black woman and first Asian American on a major-party ticket.

In questioning Harris’ American citizenship, Trump is returning to what fueled his rise in Republican politics — his insistence that Obama, the nation’s first Black president, was born

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Trump says open schools. Teachers say safety first. As cases rise, unions may win.

Chicago teachers piled into hundreds of cars on the first Monday of August and rolled their way to City Hall.

No strangers to large demonstrations, the teachers spent hours protesting Chicago Public Schools’ plan to mix in-school and at-home learning this fall to reduce crowding in buildings amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Staff didn’t feel safe teaching in person, the educators said, especially given rising rates of positive COVID-19 cases in Illinois. The demonstration had hallmarks of the massive strike the Chicago Teachers Union waged 10 months prior during a contract dispute with the city.

As union members murmured about potentially striking again for their safety, Mayor Lori Lightfoot announced Chicago’s near 400,000 students would start the year online-only on Sept. 8. That means almost all of America’s biggest districts will start the school year with online learning – a move largely driven by local teachers unions.

Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot, joined by Chicago Public Schools CEO Dr. Janice K. Jackson, right rear, announce a preliminary reopening framework for public schools during a press conference, Friday, July 17, 2020, at CPS Headquarters in Chicago.
Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot,
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Trump says open schools. Teachers say not until they’re safe. As cases rise, unions may win.

Chicago teachers piled into hundreds of cars on the first Monday of August and rolled their way to City Hall.

No strangers to large demonstrations, the teachers spent hours protesting Chicago Public Schools’ plan to mix in-school and at-home learning this fall to reduce crowding in buildings amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Staff didn’t feel safe teaching in person, the educators said, especially given rising rates of positive COVID-19 cases in Illinois. The demonstration had hallmarks of the massive strike the Chicago Teachers Union waged 10 months prior during a contract dispute with the city.

As union members murmured about potentially striking again for their safety, Mayor Lori Lightfoot announced Chicago’s near 400,000 students would start the year online-only on Sept. 8. That means almost all of America’s biggest districts will start the school year with online learning — a move largely driven by local teachers unions.

Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot, joined by Chicago Public Schools CEO Dr. Janice K. Jackson, right rear, announce a preliminary reopening framework for public schools during a press conference, Friday, July 17, 2020, at CPS Headquarters in Chicago.
Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot,
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