turned

I’m a 19-year-old TikTok influencer. Here’s how I turned social media into a job

Parker James, 19, is a social media creator based in Dallas, Texas, who has made a name for himself on TikTok through his family-friendly comedic character “StEvEn.” His character is the endearing and curious CEO of the Dino Club, a fictitious club he created for dinosaur lovers. Below James shares in his own words how he went from being an average high schooler to a TikTok powerhouse with over 6 million followers, a talent agent and making a living from creating videos.

I’ve always enjoyed making others happy.

When I was younger, I started making funny videos in hopes of making my friends and family laugh. Their reactions always made me so proud and motivated me to continue to come up with new jokes and skits.

However, as I grew older I got more into sports than my previous comedy passions. Unfortunately, while trying out a new trick on my

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How U.S. Soccer turned old jerseys into new masks for frontline workers

Deep in the bowels of the-19th century Chicago mansion that serves as the headquarters for the United States Soccer Federation, several hundred decades-old U.S. national team jerseys hung on storage racks, gathering dust.

Some of them had been worn in games by the biggest stars in modern men’s and women’s national team history. But even after a December 2019 purge during which the USSF sent many to the former players whose last names were emblazoned shirts, much of the inventory remained. Three months later the global Coronavirus pandemic hit, and with it a shortage of personal protective equipment for front line workers. An idea was born: maybe the old jerseys could be turned into functional, virus-mitigating face masks.

Led by its chief medical officer Dr. George Chiampas, U.S. Soccer had already started working on a number of COVID-19-related initiatives. Now federation staffers found themselves lurking on Esty, an online marketplace

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A timeline of how the internet turned against the top YouTubers Shane Dawson and Jeffree Star

Shane Dawson and Jeffree Star began collaborating in 2018 and have netted tens of millions of dollars together.
Shane Dawson and Jeffree Star began collaborating in 2018 and have netted tens of millions of dollars together.

Screenshot Instagram/@shanedawson, Twitter/@shanedawson

  • Shane Dawson disappeared under growing backlash against his old racist content, along with his conduct and statements regarding children and pedophiles that many deemed to be inappropriate.

  • Dawson’s explosive written response and video apology were drowned out by angry comments and exposé videos — which also targeted his frequent collaborator Jeffree Star.

  • Together, Dawson and Star have spent the past two years cultivating controversy for their own benefit, but the tide has now turned against them, and they’re losing friends and followers.

  • Notably, Dawson was called out by Jada Pinkett Smith and Jaden Smith, Target removed his books from shelves, and Morphe removed his and Jeffree Star’s makeup collections from stores.

  • On Saturday, Star posted a long-awaited video addressing the controversy. 

  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

On August

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COVID-19 turned college towns into ghost towns and businesses are struggling to survive

AMHERST, Mass. — For more than a century, the office supply store A.J. Hastings has opened its doors to the public every day without fail, a community staple in a quintessential college town.

That streak endured through the 1918 flu and world wars, national holidays and even a move. “Through thick and thin,” said Sharon Povinelli, who co-owns the store with her wife, Mary Broll.

Located in the heart of Amherst, the store has been a mainstay for students at Amherst College and Hampshire College, and the flagship campus of the University of Massachusetts.

“We’ve been here almost as long as the universities here,” Povinelli said.

The third-generation-owned business never broke its opening streak — until the coronavirus pandemic hit. A.J. Hastings, along with millions of other businesses across the country, closed in March to curb the spread of COVID-19, while colleges shut down their campuses and turned to remote

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