vaccine

Scientists Worry About Political Influence Over Coronavirus Vaccine Project

Dr. Stephen Hahn, the commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, speaks during a coronavirus task force news conference in Rockville, Md., June 30, 2020. (Samuel Corum/The New York Times)
Dr. Stephen Hahn, the commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, speaks during a coronavirus task force news conference in Rockville, Md., June 30, 2020. (Samuel Corum/The New York Times)

In April, with hospitals overwhelmed and much of the United States in lockdown, the Department of Health and Human Services produced a presentation for the White House arguing that rapid development of a coronavirus vaccine was the best hope to control the pandemic.

“DEADLINE: Enable broad access to the public by October 2020,” the first slide read, with the date in bold.

Given that it typically takes years to develop a vaccine, the timetable for the initiative, called Operation Warp Speed, was incredibly ambitious. With tens of thousands dying and tens of millions out of work, the crisis demanded an all-out public-private response, with the government supplying billions of dollars to pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, providing logistical support

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Colleges could reopen if they test students every 2 days; Fauci ‘cautiously optimistic’ for vaccine this year

In its biggest coronavirus vaccine deal yet, the U.S. said Friday it will pay French pharmaceutical company Sanofi and Great Britain’s GlaxoSmithKline up to $2.1 billion to test and produce 100 million doses of an experimental coronavirus vaccine.

The deal is part of Operation Warp Speed, a White House-led initiative aimed at getting a vaccine to stop SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

On Capitol Hill, Dr. Anthony Fauci testified Friday before a special House panel. He told the committee that he’s “cautiously optimistic” that by late fall or early winter a vaccine now being tested would be deemed safe and effective.

Also in Washington, the extra $600 in federal unemployment aid that helped many Americans stay afloat amid the coronavirus pandemic is expiring as plans for additional stimulus stalled in a deadlocked Senate.

Here are some significant developments:

  • A new survey shows fewer Americans want to resume daily activities

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Joe Biden Urges Trump To Keep Coronavirus Vaccine Progress ‘Free From Political Pressure’

Former Vice President Joe Biden urged the Trump administration to take steps to ensure the development of a vaccine for the coronavirus will be “free from political pressure” and asked the White House to respect science as the nation reels from the COVID-19 pandemic.

The presumptive Democratic nominee for president made the comments in a blog post Monday amid news that several potential coronavirus vaccines were entering large-scale trials.

“It’s great news that scientists are making progress in the search for a safe and effective COVID-19 vaccine,” Biden wrote in the blog entry. “We all hope the next phases of clinical trials will yield positive results to support an approval based on the scientific evidence, but the development of a new vaccine requires a dedication to science, coordination, transparency, truth, and fairness to all — and we have a President who stands for none of these things.”

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30,000 Americans receive Covid-19 vaccine in major test

The biggest test yet of an experimental COVID-19 vaccine got underway Monday with the first of some 30,000 Americans rolling up their sleeves to receive shots created by the U.S. government as part of the all-out global race to stop the outbreak.

The glimmer of hope came even as Google, in one of the gloomiest assessments of the coronavirus’s staying power from a major employer, decreed that most of its 200,000 employees and contractors should work from home through next June — a decision that could influence other big companies.

Final-stage testing of the vaccine, developed by the National Institutes of Health and Moderna Inc., began with volunteers at numerous sites around the U.S. given either a real dose or a dummy without being told which.

“I’m excited to be part of something like this. This is huge,” said Melissa Harting, a 36-year-old nurse who received an injection in Binghamton,

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Vice President Pence visits Miami for launch of Phase 3 of COVID vaccine clinical trial

With President Donald Trump’s poll numbers flagging in Florida as the state continues to struggle with one of the nation’s highest rates of new COVID-19 cases, Vice President Mike Pence visited the University of Miami’s Miller School of Medicine on Monday afternoon to focus attention on one of the pandemic’s few potential bright spots: the rapid development of a vaccine against the disease.

Pence touched down at Miami International Airport at about 12:30 p.m. on Monday. He walked off the plane with Dr. Stephen Hahn, commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Both wore masks, as is required in public in Miami-Dade County under an order from Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos Gimenez, who greeted the vice president at the plane along with Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis. DeSantis and Gimenez wore masks.

Pence greeted DeSantis and Gimenez by bumping forearms. They spoke on the runway for about five minutes, reviewed a

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Experimental COVID-19 vaccine is put to its biggest test

The biggest test yet of an experimental COVID-19 vaccine got underway Monday with the first of some 30,000 Americans rolling up their sleeves to receive shots created by the U.S. government as part of the all-out global race to stop the outbreak.

Final-stage testing of the vaccine, developed by the National Institutes of Health and Moderna Inc., began with volunteers at numerous sites around the U.S. given either a real dose or a dummy without being told which.

“I’m excited to be part of something like this. This is huge,” said Melissa Harting, a nurse who received an injection in Binghamton, New York. Especially with family members in front-line jobs that could expose them to the virus, she added, “doing our part to eradicate it is very important to me.”

It will be months before results trickle in, and there is no guarantee the vaccine will ultimately work against the

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meet the woman behind Britain’s vaccine hope

Professor Sarah Gilbert at Oxford University - John Lawrence
Professor Sarah Gilbert at Oxford University – John Lawrence

Professor Sarah Gilbert keeps a mug on her desk that neatly surmises her life and work: ‘keep calm and develop vaccines’. It is a mantra that has served the professor of vaccinology at Oxford University’s Jenner Institute well. After all, the team she leads has surged to the very front of the global race to develop an effective coronavirus vaccine.

This week – as has been the case on numerous occasions in recent months – her name has been plastered across the front pages. The initial results of the coronavirus vaccine published in the Lancet medical journal has confirmed the jab is safe and produces an immune response to Covid-19. Those findings have sparked renewed hope that an effective vaccine could be rolled out by the end of the year.

“It’s not surprising to us,” says the 58-year-old in her first

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GOP senators consider $600 extension; US orders 100 million vaccine doses from Pfizer; California cases top NY

The U.S. government has placed an initial order for 100 million doses of a vaccine candidate being developed by Pfizer and a German firm, BioNTech, for $1.95 billion, the companies announced Wednesday.

The U.S. can acquire up to 500 million additional doses, the statement said.

Meanwhile, federal unemployment benefits are taking a hit at a time when more states are abruptly pausing their reopening plans. The $600 weekly jobless benefits bonus, approved in March, is about to expire and likely won’t be extended or replaced before next month.

The U.S. has been averaging more than 60,000 new cases daily for multiple weeks, and hospitalizations have climbed to totals not seen in three months. A USA TODAY analysis of Johns Hopkins data through late Tuesday shows 10 states set seven-day records for new cases while five states had a record number of deaths over the period.

📈 Today’s stats: The U.S.

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GOP senators consider $600 extension; Pfizer hopes for October vaccine OK; California cases top NY

The U.S. government has placed an initial order for 100 million doses of a vaccine candidate being developed by Pfizer and a German firm, BioNTech, for $1.95 billion, the companies announced Wednesday.

The U.S. can acquire up to 500 million additional doses, the statement said.

Meanwhile, federal unemployment benefits are taking a hit at a time when more states are abruptly pausing their reopening plans. The $600 weekly jobless benefits bonus, approved in March, is about to expire and likely won’t be extended or replaced before next month.

The U.S. has been averaging more than 60,000 new cases daily for multiple weeks, and hospitalizations have climbed to totals not seen in three months. A USA TODAY analysis of Johns Hopkins data through late Tuesday shows 10 states set seven-day records for new cases while five states had a record number of deaths over the period.

📈 Today’s stats: The U.S.

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Pfizer hopes for October vaccine OK as US orders 100M doses; CDC director ‘absolutely’ wants grandkids back in school

The U.S. government has placed an initial order for 100 million doses of a vaccine candidate being developed by Pfizer and a German firm, BioNTech, for $1.95 billion, the companies announced Wednesday.

The U.S. can acquire up to 500 million additional doses, the statement said.

Meanwhile, federal unemployment benefits are taking a hit at a time when more states are abruptly pausing their reopening plans. The $600 weekly jobless benefits bonus, approved in March, is about to expire and likely won’t be extended or replaced before next month. And a former director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says states should be releasing far more data to help get a handle on the pandemic.

“We’re flying blind on the risk and effectiveness of the response,” Dr. Tom Frieden said. “Data are inconsistent, incomplete and inaccessible.”

The U.S. has been averaging more than 60,000 new cases daily for multiple

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