vet

VC icon Alan Patricof and SoulCycle vet Abby Levy launch fund to invest in aging

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They’re an unlikely duo with an unlikely plan. If it works, it could change the lives of millions of seniors and upend assumptions about venture capital. It could also make the pair—who are already fabulously wealthy—even richer.

The duo in question is 85-year-old Alan Patricof, an investor who has helped build hundreds of companies including Apple and AOL, and Abby Levy, a much younger executive who has occupied prominent roles at Soul Cycle and Arianna Huffington’s Thrive Global.

On Wednesday, the pair announced the launch of Primetime Partners, a new style of venture capital firm that will bet on innovation related to aging and seniors. In practice, this means making early stage investments of $250,000 to $1 million in startups that products for seniors, while also seeking out

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9 questions to help vet your back-to-school choices

In Brandon Wislocki’s fifth grade class this spring in California, daily virtual classes were an experiment in creativity.

The Zoom sessions featured guitar playing, group discussions about literature, live math lessons, checks for understanding through Zoom’s chat function and silly games, such as Oreo stacking and household scavenger hunts.

The remote lessons featured something many students didn’t get this spring when the coronavirus forced instruction online: the learning of new material.

Wislocki’s students at Stonegate Elementary in Irvine, California, still covered the core math and English standards that would have been taught in person from mid-March to the end of the school year. 

Brandon Wislocki, a fifth grade teacher at Stonegate Elementary School in Irvine, Calif., starts many of his virtual classes by singing to students.
Brandon Wislocki, a fifth grade teacher at Stonegate Elementary School in Irvine, Calif., starts many of his virtual classes by singing to students.

The experience suggests online learning doesn’t have to be bad. There are ways to make it more engaging and effective, education experts said. But

Read More

9 questions to ask to vet your back-to-school choices

In Brandon Wislocki’s fifth-grade class this spring in California, daily virtual classes were an experiment in creativity.

The Zoom sessions featured guitar playing, group discussions about literature, live math lessons, checks for understanding through Zoom’s chat function, and silly games, such as Oreo-stacking and household scavenger hunts.

The remote lessons also featured something many students didn’t get this spring when the coronavirus forced instruction online: the learning of new material.

Wislocki’s students at Stonegate Elementary in Irvine, California, still covered the core math and English standards that otherwise would have been taught in-person between mid-March and the end of the year. 

Brandon Wislocki, a fifth-grade teacher at Stonegate Elementary School in Irvine, California, started many of his virtual classes by singing to students.
Brandon Wislocki, a fifth-grade teacher at Stonegate Elementary School in Irvine, California, started many of his virtual classes by singing to students.

The experience suggests online learning doesn’t have to be bad. In fact, there are ways to make it more engaging and effective, education experts say. But schools

Read More