Virus

U.S. Cases Increase 0.9%; California, Arizona Slow: Virus Update

(Bloomberg) —

California and Arizona reported positive trends on new cases after battling a surge in infections last month. New Jersey, concerned about recent violations of social-distancing rules among young revelers, reduced crowd limits for indoor parties.

Eli Lilly & Co. will begin testing its Covid-19 antibody drug in nursing homes, a treatment with potential to protect vulnerable groups that vaccines may not cover. Global coronavirus cases surpassed 18 million, with the pandemic now adding a million infections every four days.

Iran’s virus death toll may have been almost three times larger than official counts, the BBC reported, while Hong Kong said it had the fewest number of new cases since July 22.

Key Developments

Global Tracker: Global cases top 18 million; deaths pass 689,000Fauci says face shields good idea for teachers back in schoolsU.K. reviewing Covid-fighting options including London lockdownFacing fierce new waves, virus hunters turn to sewage and

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As school begins amid virus, parents see few good options

WOODSTOCK, Ga. (AP) — John Barrett plans to keep his daughter home from elementary school this year in suburban Atlanta, but he wishes she was going. Molly Ball is sending her teenage sons to school in the same district on Monday, but not without feelings of regret.

As the academic year begins in many places across the country this week, parents are faced with the difficult choice of whether to send their children to school or keep them home for remote learning because of the coronavirus pandemic. Many are unhappy with either option.

“I definitely think it’s healthy for a child to go back to school,” said Ball, who feels her sons, William and Henry, both at River Ridge High School in Georgia’s Cherokee County district, suffered through enough instability in the spring. “At the same time, I wish they weren’t going back to school right now. It’s very scary.”

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Virus curfew imposed on Australia’s second-biggest city

Australia imposed an overnight curfew on its second-biggest city Sunday and banned people from moving more than five kilometres from home in a bid to control a growing coronavirus outbreak that is infecting hundreds daily.

Declaring a “state of disaster”, Victoria Premier Daniel Andrews said Melbourne would move to Stage 4 restrictions until September 13 given “unacceptably high” levels of community transmission.

The harshest rules in Australia to date will see city residents face a curfew from 8 pm to 5 am for the next six weeks. Only those carrying out essential work, or seeking or providing care, will be allowed out.

“The time for leniency, the time for warnings and cautions is over,” Andrews said.

“If you are not at home and you should be, if you have the virus and are just going about your business, you will be dealt with harshly. Lives are at stake.”

Melbourne residents

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As More Schools Stay Online, One That Opened Now Has a Virus Problem

Greenfield Central Junior High School in Greenfield, Ind., where some students were ordered to quarantine for two weeks after a student tested positive for the coronavirus on the school's first day with students back, July 31, 2020. (A J Mast/The New York Times)
Greenfield Central Junior High School in Greenfield, Ind., where some students were ordered to quarantine for two weeks after a student tested positive for the coronavirus on the school’s first day with students back, July 31, 2020. (A J Mast/The New York Times)

One of the first school districts in the country to reopen its doors during the coronavirus pandemic did not even make it a day before being forced to grapple with the issue facing every system actively trying to get students into classrooms: What happens when someone comes to school infected?

On the first day of classes Thursday, a call from the county health department notified Greenfield Central Junior High School in Indiana that a student who had walked the halls and sat in various classrooms had tested positive for the coronavirus.

Administrators began an emergency protocol, isolating the student and ordering everyone who had come into close

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How many COVID-19 virus mutations are there?

The quick answer is a lot, but only one strain is concerning doctors right now: The science world has been buzzing with troubling news that the virus that causes COVID-19 may have mutated in such a way to make it more transmissible. A preliminary study from April 30 and another on June 12 suggested that the virus variant, called G614, harbors a feature that allows the virus to more easily infect cells and therefore spread more rapidly. The concern rose even more last week when Anthony Fauci, MD, head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), broached the idea during an online chat. Here are 13 ways this coronavirus pandemic is different from all epidemics in history.

A mutation that speeds up COVID-19’s spread might explain why the virus—known as SARS-CoV-2—has so rapidly moved through North America and Europe, where the G614 mutated version is predominant. The

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COVID Hits USC Students And Faculty Hard As Virus Spreads To Younger Population

A coronavirus outbreak has hit USC’s fraternity row, where about 40 people tested positive for COVID-19, USC Student Health’s chief health officer Dr. Sarah Van Orman told the Los Angeles Times.

“A significant number of the cases were associated with four fraternity houses,” Van Orman said. The outbreak did not stop there, however.

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In all, about 150 Trojan students and employees have tested positive so far, even as the school has moved the vast majority of classes online, canceled events, limited on-campus housing, added mask requirements as well as social-distancing and symptom-checking measures.

“Unless all of us understand that right now our only tools are physical distancing and wearing masks, we’re going to continue to have devastation, not only in terms of the economy, our learning, our academics, our jobs, but people dying,” Van Orman said. “Each of us have to decide what we stand for. Frats

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Amid virus, uncertainty, parents decide how to school kids

Joshua Claybourn is leaning toward sending his kindergarten daughter to in-person classes at a private school next month. Holly Davis’ sixth-grade daughter will learn online, though the family has not yet decided what to do for school for a teenage daughter who requires special accommodations for hearing problems and dyslexia and another who’s starting college.

As they decide how their children will learn this fall amid the coronavirus pandemic, parents are anxiously weighing the benefits of in-person instruction against the risks that schools could shut their doors again or that their children could contract the virus and pass it on.

“To say we are stressed might be an understatement,” said Davis, of Noblesville, Indiana, whose family is self-isolating after one of their daughters was exposed to COVID-19 at a cross country meet. “We’re being forced to make impossible decisions.”

Across the country, chaos and disarray have marked the start of

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Does obesity make the virus more dangerous?

Getty Images
Getty Images

Following his admittance to intensive care with coronavirus in April, prime minister Boris Johnson is reportedly preparing a more “interventionist” drive to tackle UK obesity in the ongoing and long-term fight against Covid-19.

On 24 July, it was reported that the prime minister will set out new measures next week, which are expected to include a ban on TV junk food adverts before 9pm.

They are also likely to include a ban on online ads for unhealthy foods and limits on in-store promotions. Some restaurants could be required to put calorie labels on menus.

Mr Johnson is convinced his Covid-condition became more serious because of his weight – said to be 17.5 stone at the time he was taken to hospital, according to a separate report on 15 May.

This is not the most time the severity of coronavirus has been linked to a patient’s weight – when

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Trump scraps Republican convention, US virus cases top four million

Washington (AFP) – President Donald Trump announced Thursday he was scrapping the Republican nominating convention in Florida as the number of coronavirus cases in the United States topped four million.

Trump said he was cancelling next month’s event in Jacksonville because it was not the right time to do a “big, crowded convention.”

“The timing for this event is not right, it’s just not right with what’s happened recently,” he said at a White House news conference.

Trump was speaking just hours after Johns Hopkins University reported that there were now more than four million COVID-19 cases in the United States.

With a total of 4,028,741 cases and more than 144,000 deaths, the United States is by far the hardest-hit country in the world, with Brazil and India trailing in second and third place for infection numbers.

The country has seen a coronavirus surge, particularly in southern and western states,

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Nancy Pelosi Calls Out ‘the Trump Virus’ as Trump Continues to Call COVID-19 the ‘China Virus’

As President Donald Trump continues to refer to the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) as “the China virus” — despite widespread backlash — House Speaker Nancy Pelosi this week flipped it around in an attack of her own.

In a Tuesday interview with CNN’s Wolf Blitzer, Pelosi reacted to Trump’s latest coronavirus briefing at the White House and argued that, despite his more somber tone earlier in the day, he had exacerbated the pandemic in the U.S.

“If he had said months ago ‘Let’s wear a mask, let’s socially distance’ instead of having rallies and political-whatever-they-were, then more people would have followed his lead as the president of the United States, instead of being a bad example making it like a manhood thing not to wear a mask,” she said.

“A briefing on the coronavirus should be about science and that is something the president has ignored,” Pelosi, 80, added. “So I

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