worried

‘If I start university this year, I’m worried I won’t make friends or get the support I need’

Olivia dark, 18: ‘I’d mentally prepared to go this year and have no idea what I’d do in a gap year. I feel ready to start a new chapter in my life’ - JAY WILLIAMS
Olivia dark, 18: ‘I’d mentally prepared to go this year and have no idea what I’d do in a gap year. I feel ready to start a new chapter in my life’ – JAY WILLIAMS

For countless British school leavers, the emotional maelstrom of the past few months didn’t end on Thursday when A-level results were announced.

This weekend, many Year 13 students are grappling with the dilemma of what to do next. Accept a university offer, even though they might miss out on the full student experience because of the pandemic? Or defer or reject a place, until some semblance of normality returns?

With little or no face-to-face teaching at universities until 2021, the prospect of starting an expensive degree just doesn’t add up for some students.

There are also fears that all the fun of starting university, and opportunities to make friends, will be missing because freshers’ week

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Kanye West says he’s ‘doing well’ with Dave Chapelle as Kim Kardashian is ‘worried and upset’: Source

Kanye West had a visitor to his Wyoming ranch amid his headline-making tweets about his family — but it wasn’t wife Kim Kardashian. The rapper and 2020 presidential candidate shared a video on Tuesday with “true friend,” Dave Chapelle. West thanked the comedian on Twitter for “hopping on a jet to come see me doing well.”

In the clip, West appeared upbeat with a group of friends. At one point, he asked Chapelle to tell a joke: “Alright Dave, can you please make us smile? The world needs some — we need some joy, we need a smile.”

“The brotherhood is real,” Chapelle replied. “Love is real.”

West asked Chapelle again to tell an uplifting joke, to which the comedian quipped, “Now you know I don’t write them.” That made the Yeezy designer laugh and he and Chapelle exchanged hugs.

“I love you,” West told the comedian. “Thanks for coming

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Are you worried about your elderly parents? 8 tips to help seniors stay mentally acute in isolation

Fitness coordinator Janet Hollander leads session of Balcony Boogie from outside Willamette Oaks in Eugene, Ore. for residents isolated in apartments during pandemic, April 21, 2020.
Fitness coordinator Janet Hollander leads session of Balcony Boogie from outside Willamette Oaks in Eugene, Ore. for residents isolated in apartments during pandemic, April 21, 2020.

Just what we need: Another reason to fear and loathe COVID-19.

If your loved ones are old, ill and confined to an assisted living or senior care home, you already know they are especially vulnerable to the killer virus, as the devastating death statistics in nursing homes attest. 

But you might not realize the efforts to protect them by isolating them has potentially dangerous consequences, too.

This became alarmingly obvious to Mary Ann Sternberg after her longtime partner, Ron, a retired psychologist who has Parkinson’s disease, was confined to the grounds along with the rest of the residents of his high-quality assisted living community in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, after they all went into lockdown in March. 

The residents couldn’t go out and their relatives

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More than 1,000 aspiring surgeons couldn’t take a critical online exam after the system failed. Now they’re left worried it may never happen.

surgeon
surgeon

HRAUN/Getty Images

  • An exam taken by surgeons in the US saw its online system fail Thursday, leaving more than 1,000 aspiring surgeons in the dark on when — or if — they will take the test.

  • The test is a critical and costly part of transitioning from medical resident to a board-certified surgeon. 

  • The American Board of Surgery runs the tests and used a virtual proctor company called Proctortrack to give the test. 

  • Four aspiring surgeons told Business Insider they were frustrated with the lack of transparency and incompetence from the organization. The unknown delay could make it difficult for them to take the exam later, which requires weeks of intense studying beforehand.

  • “I have to start working,” one said. “I don’t have the financial security to sit back for a month and not be paid.”

  • For more stories like this, sign up here for our healthcare newsletter, Dispensed.

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More than 1,000 aspiring surgeons couldn’t take a critical online exam after the system failed. Now, they’re left worried if it’ll ever happen.

surgeon
surgeon

HRAUN/Getty Images

  • An exam taken by surgeons in the US saw its online system fail Thursday, leaving more than 1,000 aspiring surgeons in the dark on when — or if — they will take the test.

  • The test is a critical and costly part of transitioning from medical resident to a board-certified surgeon. 

  • The American Board of Surgery runs the tests and used a virtual proctor company called Proctortrack to give the test. 

  • Four aspiring surgeons, speaking anonymously to Business Insider, said they are frustrated with the lack of transparency and incompetence from the organization. The unknown delay could make it difficult for them to take the exam later, which requires weeks of intense studying beforehand.

  • “I have to start working,” one said. “I don’t have the financial security to sit back for a month and not be paid.”

  • For more stories like this, sign up here for our

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