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Parents Brace for a Go-It-Alone School Year

Parents across America are facing the pandemic school year feeling overwhelmed, anxious and abandoned. With few good options for support, the vast majority have resigned themselves to going it alone, a new survey for The New York Times has found.

Just one in seven parents said their children would be returning to school full time this fall, and for most children, remote school requires hands-on help from an adult at home. Yet four in five parents said they would have no in-person help educating and caring for them, whether from relatives, neighbors, nannies or tutors, according to the survey, administered by Morning Consult. And more than half of parents will be taking on this second, unpaid job at the same time they’re holding down paid work.

Raising children has always been a community endeavor, and suddenly the village that parents relied on is gone. It’s taking a toll on parents’

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Many Schools Are Using a Hybrid Learning Model This Year; Here’s What Parents Should Know

going back to school in the traditional sense may be entirely off the table. And regardless of how old your children are, navigating these uncertain times have proven to be a hellish nightmare we wish we could wake up from challenging to say the least. While some families are setting up “pandemic pods” – where a small group of students of similar ages and abilities gathers at one family’s home to learn from a teacher – others are working with their local districts using a hybrid learning model.” data-reactid=”19″Depending on what part of the US you live in, going back to school in the traditional sense may be entirely off the table. And regardless of how old your children are, navigating these uncertain times have proven to be a hellish nightmare we wish we could wake up from challenging to say the least. While some families are

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COVID-19 symptoms often appear in this order, and why you really should get your flu shot this year

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is calling on House lawmakers to return this week to vote on a bill that would block the changes that the Trump administration has made to the U.S. Postal Service. 

Pelosi and other Democrats say the changes will cause a slowing of the flow of mail and potentially jeopardize the November election. Pelosi’s request comes after a testy few days over the Postal Service and whether it’s up to handling an unprecedented number of mail-in ballots this year because of increased vote-by-mail eligibility amid the coronavirus outbreak.

Meanwhile, public health officials are urging the public to get flu vaccines, saying they’re even more important than ever because of COVID-19. The flu shot isn’t always effective, but it’s much better than nothing. And it’s hard to know how the flu will interact with COVID-19.

Also, a group of researchers from University of Southern California tracked the common

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Moms brace for school year juggling jobs, remote learning amid COVID-19 pandemic

Traci Wells was at a school board meeting when she found out the springtime balancing act between her job and helping her children with online schooling would stretch into the fall. 

“I was like, I cannot do six more months of this,” says Wells, a mother of four, who is director of education for the global health program at UCLA’s David Geffen School of Medicine. With her husband working as well, “I don’t know how we’re going to be on all the calls and get the work done when we have these responsibilities. It’s just really, really hard.”

When the coronavirus outbreak led schools to shut down in the spring, parents had to quickly rally, juggling their jobs with the added roles of teacher, tutor and occasional IT technician.

It was a stressful time, but one that many families presumed would be temporary, coming at the end of the school

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Parents must be allowed to pick their poison this school year

The usual debates in education circles aren’t helping right now.

These conversations — about school choice and vouchers and equity, public vs. private vs. charter vs. home, standardized testing and screen time and district residency rules and teachers’ unions — can’t be suspended as COVID-19 spikes around the country ahead of the start of the fall semester. But in their status quo version, such debates are distorting the more pressing matter of getting through this hell year. It won’t work to shoehorn discussion of this semester into our normal policy frameworks.

Perhaps instead of sticking to those ordinary patterns, we could start with two presuppositions: Just about every option will be worse for disadvantaged students. And families should be given as many choices as possible to navigate this fall.

Parents must be allowed to pick their poison.

Consider how re-openings will affect disadvantaged students. If public schools open their doors,

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Parents brace for school year juggling jobs, remote learning amid COVID-19 pandemic

Traci Wells was at a school board meeting when she found out the springtime balancing act between her job and helping her children with online schooling would stretch into the fall. 

“I was like, I cannot do six more months of this,” says Wells, a mother of four, who is director of education for the global health program at UCLA’s David Geffen School of Medicine. With her husband working as well, “I don’t know how we’re going to be on all the calls and get the work done when we have these responsibilities. It’s just really, really hard.”

When the coronavirus outbreak led schools to shut down in the spring, parents had to quickly rally, juggling their jobs with the added roles of teacher, tutor and occasional IT technician.

It was a stressful time, but one that many families presumed would be temporary, coming at the end of the school

Read More

Should I go to university this year?

Getty Images
Getty Images

Today, A-level students around the country will have received their results, giving them an indication of where they might go to university. The results were expected to be mired in controversy following a last-minute decision by the government to allow students in England to use mock exam results if they wish.

This followed a fiasco in Scotland where more than 100,000 students were downgraded in their results, and the Scottish education secretary said they would be scrapped and returned to the original teacher predictions.

On Thursday, the government was accused of a “huge injustice” as nearly 40 per cent of A-level results have been downgraded. Labour leader Keir Starmer described the situation as a “complete fiasco”. “It was obvious this was going to be difficult but it’s been weeks or months in the coming,” he said.

For many students who might have got lower grades than they

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‘If I start university this year, I’m worried I won’t make friends or get the support I need’

Olivia dark, 18: ‘I’d mentally prepared to go this year and have no idea what I’d do in a gap year. I feel ready to start a new chapter in my life’ - JAY WILLIAMS
Olivia dark, 18: ‘I’d mentally prepared to go this year and have no idea what I’d do in a gap year. I feel ready to start a new chapter in my life’ – JAY WILLIAMS

For countless British school leavers, the emotional maelstrom of the past few months didn’t end on Thursday when A-level results were announced.

This weekend, many Year 13 students are grappling with the dilemma of what to do next. Accept a university offer, even though they might miss out on the full student experience because of the pandemic? Or defer or reject a place, until some semblance of normality returns?

With little or no face-to-face teaching at universities until 2021, the prospect of starting an expensive degree just doesn’t add up for some students.

There are also fears that all the fun of starting university, and opportunities to make friends, will be missing because freshers’ week

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A Week At A University In Detroit, MI, That Costs $30,000 A Year

Welcome to Money Diaries College Edition where we are tackling the ever-present taboo that is money. We’re asking real people how they spend their hard-earned money during a seven-day period — and we’re tracking every last dollar.

Today: a public health major at a university that costs $30,000 per year who spends some of her money this week on a cupcake.

Major: Public Health with Pre-Med
Age: 21
Location: Detroit, MI
University Size: 25,000
Yearly Tuition Cost: $30,000 (I am on a full merit scholarship that covers my tuition, housing, and meal plan)
Current Student Loan Total: $0
Salary/Allowance: I work as an MCAT tutor, which pays $25 an hour (I work three hours a week) and as a peer mentor for my university, which pays $10 an hour (our hours were reduced to 10 hours/week due to COVID)
Paycheck Amount (Every two weeks): $275
Pronouns: She/her

Monthly Expenses

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Manny Diaz calls 2020 a ‘day-by-day’ year, addresses ‘the elephant in the room’ daily

University of Miami football coach Manny Diaz made a surprise appearance during a Zoom videoconference with the media Tuesday night.

He spoke about everything from the first five days of practice to handling coronavirus-related matters to the news of the Big Ten and Pac-10 announcing they won’t play football this season.

“Here at the University of Miami our focus is on what we can control,’’ Diaz said. “We’re aware of the news going on around the country but that doesn’t really change what’s going on here. What our players and our staff can control is No. 1 staying healthy, with all the methods and protocols we have put in place here and show an example that we can play football and we can keep this virus out of our building.

“This is 2020. This is a day-by-day, week-by-week year. but I am proud of our guys in terms of the

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