year

Some parents want to hire tutors, start mini schools this year. Most can’t afford to.

CHICAGO – Millions of parents across the nation are facing difficult decisions about what to do with their kids this school year. But the pandemic affects every family differently, for reasons that range from their socioeconomic status to their health to the fields they work in.

Some parents are in a better position than others to ensure their children stay healthy and keep up with schoolwork, and researchers are raising questions about how the pandemic may exacerbate existing educational inequalities.

“Kids who are disproportionately low-income are at highest risk for learning losses,” said Ariel Kalil, a professor at the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy. “When these gaps in learning open up, absent some really serious and sustained intervention, the kids won’t (catch up). That will result in less academic achievement, lower lifetime earnings and even lower productivity in adulthood.”

USA TODAY spoke with more than a dozen

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One year later, El Paso reflects on the hate behind Walmart shooting

Roberto Jurado hid with his 88-year-old mother between toy machines at the entrance of the Cielo Vista Walmart. 

Lying in broken glass, he listened as the sound of gunshots grew closer. Then the man with the AK-47 was only 10 feet away. 

“That day, I believe I stared death in the eyes,” Jurado, 53, said.

But the shooter left after his attention was drawn to a moving vehicle outside the store, and Jurado and his mother survived.

Jurado spent the next few hours helping victims in the Aug. 3 mass shooting and giving statements to police. Later that evening, he sat down, popped open a beer and flipped on the news: The gunman had allegedly driven more than 600 miles across the state from North Texas to target Hispanics in the border community. 

The fear and adrenaline he felt throughout the day turned to anger. He’d been a target of

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Online school? Some parents want to hire tutors, start mini schools this year. Most can’t afford to.

CHICAGO – Millions of parents across the nation are facing difficult decisions about what to do with their kids this school year. But the pandemic affects every family differently, for reasons that range from their socioeconomic status to their health to the fields they work in.

Some parents are in a better position than others to ensure their children stay healthy and keep up with schoolwork, and researchers are raising questions about how the pandemic may continue to exacerbate existing educational inequalities.

“Kids who are disproportionately low-income are at highest risk for learning losses,” said Ariel Kalil, a professor at the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy. “When these gaps in learning open up, absent some really serious and sustained intervention, the kids won’t (catch up). That will result in less academic achievement, lower lifetime earnings and even lower productivity in adulthood.”

USA TODAY spoke with more than

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North Penn To Begin School Year Fully Online

LANSDALE, PA — The North Penn School Board of Directors voted on Thursday evening to begin the school year fully online, with no in-person instruction through early November. They join Norristown and Upper Dublin as other Montgomery County school districts who have decided against bringing students back into physical classrooms to start the year.

The board unanimously passed the motion, 9-0. The board will consider a possible shift to a hybrid model, with students learning partially online and partially in-person, on Nov. 6, which is the end of the marking period for older students.

>>Coronavirus Spreading Among Youth Sports Teams In Montco

“As we learn more, we can adjust accordingly,” board member Jonathan Kassa said during the meeting.

Both the board and members of the school community who participated in the public meeting cited the numerous risks and the ongoing uncertainty of the pandemic and its course in the county.

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Colleges could reopen if they test students every 2 days; Fauci ‘cautiously optimistic’ for vaccine this year

In its biggest coronavirus vaccine deal yet, the U.S. said Friday it will pay French pharmaceutical company Sanofi and Great Britain’s GlaxoSmithKline up to $2.1 billion to test and produce 100 million doses of an experimental coronavirus vaccine.

The deal is part of Operation Warp Speed, a White House-led initiative aimed at getting a vaccine to stop SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

On Capitol Hill, Dr. Anthony Fauci testified Friday before a special House panel. He told the committee that he’s “cautiously optimistic” that by late fall or early winter a vaccine now being tested would be deemed safe and effective.

Also in Washington, the extra $600 in federal unemployment aid that helped many Americans stay afloat amid the coronavirus pandemic is expiring as plans for additional stimulus stalled in a deadlocked Senate.

Here are some significant developments:

  • A new survey shows fewer Americans want to resume daily activities

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Khan Academy CEO Sal Khan on the new school year and virtual learning

Last spring, with schools shut down to curb the spread of the coronavirus pandemic, educational apps became a lifesaver.

As parents, educators and students adjusted to the virtual classroom, many leaned on apps and tech to help bridge the gaps in learning.

Among them was the popular Khan Academy, started by founder and CEO Sal Khan in 2005 to provide videos and tools to help students learn math, science and more subjects.

In an interview with USA TODAY, Khan said he first learned of school closures due to the pandemic in February, after receiving letters from South Korea of teachers using Khan Academy. In the following months, schools began to close in the U.S. in favor of virtual learning.

“When it started to become clear that school closures might happen we started to do a bit of a war room around ‘OK we’ve gotta provide more support for teachers, for

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Miami-Dade County Public Schools to begin school year online only and later Aug. 31 date

Miami-Dade County Public Schools will start the school year remotely — and late — on Aug. 31, school officials announced Wednesday.

Students, parents and teachers have been anticipating what some would say was an inevitable decision by school officials. With less than a month to go and an infection rate in Miami-Dade County more three times higher than the school district’s goal of 5%, reopening schools by the original Aug. 24 date was deemed impossible.

The announcement came during a special School Board meeting.

“We are ever cognizant that many families have already begun planning for a return to schooling through their preferred model for Stage II,” said Miami-Dade Schools Superintendent Alberto Carvalho. “However, in light of the viral surge in our community, we believe it is in the best interest of our students and employees to delay the return to the schoolhouse and commence the 2020-2021 school year from

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All the Must-See Movie and TV Panels This Year

After originally hanging up the cape on this year’s San Diego Comic-Con, organizers decided to instead go virtual with [email protected], an online convention running July 22 – 26 that anybody with a WiFi connection can partake in from the comfort of their own homes. (And, better still, for free!)

This year’s schedule — featuring more than 350 panels — isn’t skimping on the stars, either: Keanu Reeves, Amy Poehler, The Walking Dead cast and Lord and Miller are only some of the famous faces who will be Zooming into their respective panels, to stream via Comic-Con’s website and YouTube channel.

Which means no badges, no waiting in lines, no epic quest to secure a seat in Hall H. Just you, your sofa and this list of must-see movie and TV panels. All indicated times are in PT.

Wednesday

See Wednesday’s full programing schedule here.

Thursday

10:00 a.m.: Star Trek Universe

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private Zoom tutors spark controversy as virtual school year looms

<span>Photograph: John Moore/Getty Images</span>
Photograph: John Moore/Getty Images

Elyssa Katz, a Santa Monica mother of three, is growing a matchmaking service to connect families with tutors, or “Zutors”, as she calls them – a word she’s in the process of trademarking.

“The role of a Zutor is a tutor, a nanny, and an angel for a parent,” Katz told the Guardian, someone who can take over parental demands, help children with online homework and take them outside when it’s time for “recess”.

Katz’s clients range from the rich and famous, to everyday people who need childcare because they can’t look after their children while they have to work. Katz said she had gotten calls from parents as far away as the Hamptons.

For a matchmaking fee that can range from $700 to $1,000 (£549 to £785), Katz and her team will interview tutor candidates, run background and reference checks, then match them to the

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desperate parents seek private help as virtual school year looms

<span>Photograph: John Moore/Getty Images</span>
Photograph: John Moore/Getty Images

Elyssa Katz, a Santa Monica mother of three, is growing a matchmaking service to connect families with tutors, or “Zutors”, as she calls them – a word she’s in the process of trademarking.

“The role of a Zutor is a tutor, a nanny, and an angel for a parent,” Katz told the Guardian, someone who can take over parental demands, help children with online homework and take them outside when it’s time for “recess”.

Katz’s clients range from the rich and famous, to everyday people who need childcare because they can’t look after their children while they have to work. Katz said she had gotten calls from parents as far away as the Hamptons.

For a matchmaking fee that can range from $700 to $1,000 (£549 to £785), Katz and her team will interview tutor candidates, run background and reference checks, then match them to the

Read More