Duquesne University professor who used N-word in class video on paid leave, pending investigation

A Duquesne University professor who used the N-word in a class video is on paid leave, pending investigation, the university confirmed Friday evening. A university spokesman confirmed the faculty member in the video, Professor Gary Shank, is no longer teaching and another professor is taking over the course. The course […]

A Duquesne University professor who used the N-word in a class video is on paid leave, pending investigation, the university confirmed Friday evening. A university spokesman confirmed the faculty member in the video, Professor Gary Shank, is no longer teaching and another professor is taking over the course. The course was educational psychology, and it was held at 10-10:50 a.m. “As this is a personal matter, further specifics cannot be discussed, but another professor is taking over the course,” the university said in a statement. In a video shared on social media, the professor can be seen explaining how the word will be used in “the pedagogical sense.”He then gives examples of when that word was used when he was younger. The university said School of Education Dean Gretchen Generett sent the following letter to the students in the class within moments of learning about the incident: “I am writing this afternoon to let you know that I am aware of what transpired in your class yesterday and to offer my sincere apologies to you for what you experienced. I learned about this incident from students who emailed their advisor. I am also aware that a student emailed the professor directly. I understand that sending those emails was not easy and I want to thank students for using their voices to share the troubling and disturbing language that was used by your professor in class. “To be clear, I believe that there is never a time, pedagogically or otherwise, for a professor to create a hostile learning environment. I know this from my experience as a student, a professor, and now as Interim Dean of the School of Education. Using the ‘N word’ or seemingly encouraging students to use that word is not in keeping with the mission of the University, the School of Education, or the Pennsylvania Department of Education. “As a professor in the Leading Teaching Program here in the School of Education, I often speak about teachable moments. This is one of them. As an educator, you should always be mindful of the impact of your actions on the students you are obligated by the profession to teach. Your intentions are of no consequence when a student’s learning is disrupted by what you believe to be okay. Your actions are what students will remember. “Please know that this matter is being taken very seriously by School of Education leadership, and please feel free to reach out to us if you have any ongoing questions or concerns.” The university said it takes seriously its work in creating an inclusive environment.

A Duquesne University professor who used the N-word in a class video is on paid leave, pending investigation, the university confirmed Friday evening.

A university spokesman confirmed the faculty member in the video, Professor Gary Shank, is no longer teaching and another professor is taking over the course.

The course was educational psychology, and it was held at 10-10:50 a.m.

“As this is a personal matter, further specifics cannot be discussed, but another professor is taking over the course,” the university said in a statement.

In a video shared on social media, the professor can be seen explaining how the word will be used in “the pedagogical sense.”

He then gives examples of when that word was used when he was younger.

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This content is imported from Twitter.
You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

The university said School of Education Dean Gretchen Generett sent the following letter to the students in the class within moments of learning about the incident:

“I am writing this afternoon to let you know that I am aware of what transpired in your class yesterday and to offer my sincere apologies to you for what you experienced. I learned about this incident from students who emailed their advisor. I am also aware that a student emailed the professor directly. I understand that sending those emails was not easy and I want to thank students for using their voices to share the troubling and disturbing language that was used by your professor in class.

“To be clear, I believe that there is never a time, pedagogically or otherwise, for a professor to create a hostile learning environment. I know this from my experience as a student, a professor, and now as Interim Dean of the School of Education. Using the ‘N word’ or seemingly encouraging students to use that word is not in keeping with the mission of the University, the School of Education, or the Pennsylvania Department of Education.

“As a professor in the Leading Teaching Program here in the School of Education, I often speak about teachable moments. This is one of them. As an educator, you should always be mindful of the impact of your actions on the students you are obligated by the profession to teach. Your intentions are of no consequence when a student’s learning is disrupted by what you believe to be okay. Your actions are what students will remember.

“Please know that this matter is being taken very seriously by School of Education leadership, and please feel free to reach out to us if you have any ongoing questions or concerns.”

The university said it takes seriously its work in creating an inclusive environment.

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